1973 Mustang Heater Box Part 1

Maybe one of the worse task to tackle on a car is the heater core.  In particular on some older cars.  In most cases you have to remove the entire dash.   I know this because when the heater core sprung a leak in my 1974 Cobra Jet Torino, I didn’t have the time to fix it.  I took it to a shop and the cost was hefty.

Since I’m doing a lot more of my own work on #ProjectSportRoof and I’m going to dive in and replace the heater core and like the Torino it is an A/C car.

Now the goal is to attempt to remove the box without taking the entire dash out – that is a huge time sync and it leads down the road of ” since I have it out, I might as well  fix…”.

I refer to the heater box as the portion to the right of the blower, there are some references that include the blower as well.  There are only 3 bolts holding the heater box in place, two are behind the unit and poke through the firewall and one is in the front.  I’m hoping the rest is just getting it in the right angle to pull it out.

I don’t have a camera guy only a small tri-pod  that I can set in limited flat spots and record what I can.

HINT:   Remove the passenger seat, it sure does help.

Here we go:

 

Coming up we’ll take a close look at the box, access what needs to be done.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

newprimedhood

 

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Video 7 – Mains and Pistons …

Aug 25, 2016 Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. This the beginning of rebuild of the 351 Cleveland for the 73 Mustang. 73 Mustang 351 Cleveland …
Average Guy’s Car Restorations, Mods, and Racing

Tagged: ProjectSportsRoof. Source: … Tagged: ProjectSportsRoof · 22nd September 2016 … Thanks for continuing to follow #ProjectSportsRoof. The 351 …
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The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took … Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C …
73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Rebuild – Removal 2 – YouTube

Jul 27, 2016 Prepping the engine and engine bay for removing #ProjectSportsRoof power plant.

projectsportsroof

 

 

 

73 Mustang 351C Rebuild – Tear Down’s Final Conclusion

Thanks for continuing to follow #ProjectSportsRoof.   The 351 Cleveland has been torn down and you’ve seen the major components and their deplorable condition and it is time now to get it to the machine shop.

It’s not easy finding a good shop.  While I was hunting around for a machinist I asked a few car guys I know for suggestions and found the two that were recommended were out of business.  That is not uncommon.  It is often times more expedient to just drop in a crate  or re-manufactured engine (long or short block) and that’s tough to compete against.  I was concerned that I’d have to transport the 351C block 100 miles away to check get the work done.

While I was searching for a shop, I was simultaneously search for a re-man’ed long or short block.  Of course I was specifically looking for a closely date code 351C and I was told that those blocks are not plentiful.   I took my local search to the hot rod shops (by hot rod shops I mean, shops that sell hot rod parts) in town and the shop I chose was recommended by several.  I double checked the review that were available and these guys have a very good rep.  I’m going to withhold the name until I get the block back.

 

 


 Luckily I had the block still bolted to the engine stand.  That and my cat-like reflexes (HA) kept a disaster from occurring.

Hoisted!!!

Hoisted!!!                                                                                                                                                                    ^^^ lots of Mustang parts

Not withstanding my attempts to bounce the block off the garage floor it is finally suspended and ready to get loaded.

Tied Down

Tied Down – This is the fastest this engine has done in months!!!

 

Upon arrival at the machine shop two guys unloaded the block and I asked them to measure the current bore and the size of the crank.

The results were as follows:

The stock bore is 4″ and the measurements of the current bore is .030  under making the bore 4.030.   You’ve seen the condition of the cylinders and the shop recommended to take another .010 off making the proposed bore 4.040″.

Now the crank was measured as well and it was .010 machined from stock thickness.  Purposed is to take it down another .010 to .020 under.

The shop recommended to replace the cam, so that will happen.

This ended the speculation about the originality of the engine.  Clearly this was rebuilt at least once.

Now decisions need to be made.  But first let’s take stock of where we are and then play a little “What If”, shall we?

Using this standard formula for determining displacement:  Bore2 X Stroke X 0.7854 X Cylinders  (laid out below from a spreadsheet)

Bore X Bore  X Stroke X 0.7854 X Cylinders = Displacement
Stock 4 4 3.5 0.7854 8 351.8592
Current 4.03 4.03 3.5 0.7854 8 357.1568801
Proposed 4.04 4.04 3.5 0.7854 8 358.9315699

Just cleaning up the cylinders will move  the displacement  from 351 (stock) to 358 as proposed.  That is currently where we are.

Now let’s play What If!!!  What if I increased the bore a bit more?  Here is what that look like in displacement terms.

Taking up the bore one more .010 to 4.05″  looks like this.

Bore X Bore  X Stroke X 0.7854 X Cylinders = Displacement
Option 4.05 4.05 3.5 0.7854 8 360.710658

4.05 is the furthest  I want to do with the bore – if it’s possible.  I know one Mustang owner that has his bore 4.06″, however, I’m not comfortable with that. So we’ve increased the displacement 360.

Now let’s work on the stroke.  The machining of the crank will net little to no change in the displacement. To increase that I’d have to go with a different crank.  So what do those number look like?  Leaving the bore at 4.04 and increase the stroke yields the following increases:

Bore             x                  Bore                      x             Stroke                    x                   0.7854                    x        #Cylinders                                            Displacement

Option 4.04 4.04 3.75 0.7854 8 384.5695392
Option 4.04 4.04 4 0.7854 8 410.2075085 Basically the 400

Let’s go a bit further with the increase in bore:

Bore             x                  Bore                      x             Stroke                    x                   0.7854                    x        #Cylinders                                            Displacement

Option 4.05 4.05 3.75 0.7854 8 386.475705
Option 4.05 4.05 4 0.7854 8 412.240752
Option 4.05 4.05 3.85 0.7854 8 396.7817238 Off the shelf long stroke cranks
Option 4.04 4.04 3.85 0.7854 8 394.8247269 Off the shelf long stroke cranks

Care to share your thoughts on the build?   Drop me a note!!!

Thanks for reading.

Tim

HoodPrimer-14

 

projectsportsroof

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Video 7 – Mains and Pistons …

Aug 25, 2016 Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. This the beginning of rebuild of the 351 Cleveland for the 73 Mustang. 73 Mustang 351 Cleveland …
collectors cars | Tumblr

The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took … Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C …
classic ford mustang | Tumblr

Thanks checking back in with the 1973 Mustang (#ProjectSportsRoof). I’m moving right along with getting the progress on the 351C tear down posted up.

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear-Down – Cylinder Inspection

Well we are finally at the next to last post for the tear down of my 1973 Mustang SportsRoof  351 Cleveland.  Everything has been removed and we can not get a look at the last piece of  the puzzle in figuring out what needs to be done to make this thing run again.

Take a look at the cylinders.

 

 

All the indications are that this engine was oil starved at some point. I’m sure it was a result of the valve supporting the #2 cylinder being fired shut, but that is still just a guess.

If you look back at earlier posts, I waffled between guessing if this Cleveland had been apart and worked on.  Well by the sight of the cross-hatching it’s clear that the cylinders have been worked before and I’m guessing the rings are well.

Next the block, crank and cam are headed off to a machine shop and things become very clear after the experts look at this 351C.

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

HoodPrimer-14

 

projectsportsroof

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Video 7 – Mains and Pistons …

Aug 25, 2016 Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. This the beginning of rebuild of the 351 Cleveland for the 73 Mustang. 73 Mustang 351 Cleveland …

collectors cars | Tumblr

The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took … Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C …

vintage mustangs | Tumblr

Thanks checking back in with the 1973 Mustang (#ProjectSportsRoof). … the knocking in the bottom end and if the 351 Cleveland in #ProjectSportsRoof is going …

 

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down – Crank and Cam Removal/Inspection

Welcome  to #ProjectSportsRoof and the seeming never ending processing of tearing down the 351C.  We are in the final stages and I wanted to show you the crank and cam condition.  I put together the video below.


 As you can see the crank is not in great shape and the cam is a bit worn.  The crank is going to have to be turned and the cam might be beyond polishing.

Leaving the flange on was a time set back as I had to stabilize the engine with the hoist so that I could unbolt it from the engine stand.  I had intended to drop it on an engine cradle but I hadn’t even un-boxed it yet so I removed the flange and the flex plate and bolted it back on the engine stand.

It’s now clear that the engine had severe oil starvation at some point and this caused all the damage – ring wear in the cylinders (you’ll see that coming up), severe wear crank and main bearings.

It just about time to get this block off to the machine shop.  I’m going to have them do some measurements for me and help decide what needs to be done to save this engine.

I have a couple more posts for the tear down and those are coming up.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

HoodPrimer-14

projectsportsroof

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Video 7 – Mains and Pistons …

Aug 25, 2016 Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. This the beginning of rebuild of the 351 Cleveland for the 73 Mustang. 73 Mustang 351 Cleveland …
collectors cars | Tumblr

The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took … Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C …
Great American Muscle Cars – muscle cars – Community – Google+

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. With the floor pans welding, sealing and coating finished the next step was to apply the heat and sound barrier. This is …

 

Reader’s Car: 1970 Mustang Export to The Land Down Under – Pete’s Ride.

Nothing is better than hearing from a reader, unless that reader send pictures of his ride.

Pete has a beautiful 1970 Mustang coupe out in Western Suburbs of Sydney in New South Wales.

Hi Tim,

Attached are a couple of pictures, one when I got her with wheels, didn’t like them so I put on another set, (the Boyd’s one). The wheels on the car when I bought them were from a 96-02 cobra GT so they had the wrong offset, with that, it meant it needed spacers. The Boyd’s need no spacers, correct offset.

Engine mods done via previous owner;

  • Trickflow twisted wedge heads, roller rockers
  • Flowtech custom roller camshaft
  • LSD 3.55 8’3/4” ford diff
  • Biggs performance 650 double pumper carb
  • Weiand stealth intake manifold

To date I have done the following;

  • Replaced rear leafs with reverse eyelet leafs, they had normal ones with lowering blocks before
  • Put a Mallory large HEI distributor (don’t hate me)
  • Converted from automatic to manual (4 speed toploader, 11
    “ clutch setup)
  • Stereo, though I rarely listen to it, the engine is music to my ears
  • Replaced leaky power assist steering with all new manual steering
  • 5” exhaust throughout, pacemaker headers, which is where my current problem is

 

Regards,

Pete

Pete says he’s had this beauty “About 4 years or so now I’ve had it, been interesting with the level of fixing that she needs, I had an Aussie version of the Chevelle and that was solid. Still prefer the sound of the ford motor though.”  The coupe was purchased just up the road from me in Lake Havasu.

 

 

Love the color!!!

Love the color!!!

Window are tinted just right!!!

Windows are tinted just right!!!

 

Thanks Pete for sharing the pics of your 1970 Coupe, I miss my 1970.

What to share your ride?  Drop me a note at agcarrestoration@cox.net

Thanks for reading.
Tim

1970 Mustang

1970 Mustang

Wrenchin’ Tip – ’70 Mustang Transmission Swap

As I get ready to start the new round of mods for my 1970 Mustang Coupe, I’m reminded of a couple of issues that came up when I was assisting  a fellow Mustang owner doing a trans –  transplant. The first tip is partially dependent on what stage you are in …

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down – The Pistons

Moving right along with #ProjectSportsRoof.  I’m pulling the piston in this posting.

A couple of things to note.  I record these days before I actually get to post them (in case you can’t tell) and many times the entire days work is broken up into multiple posts.  So you might hear similar comments in new posts, that I’ve already corrected in the previous one.  For example, it might seem I’m obsession over the oil situation, “There’s lot of oil….blah…blah…blah.” Of course that’s true at that point and time, but as the Cleveland came a part – it’s clear that great lubrication wasn’t always the case, barring foreign matter getting in the engine – given damage seen thus far it would have been a pile of sand dumped in the block.

There’s also the fact that there are indications that the engine might have been apart previously (not just the heads).  Maybe a ring job.  I just can’t tell for sure.  What I can tell is that at least the piston rods are original Ford equipment if not original to this engine, as they have the Ford Oval and are coded D0AEA – D0 = 1970.  It’s not a stretch that think that Ford used piston rods from 1970 in a 1972 engine.  Take a look and see what you think:

 

pistonMark-5

BS9 Markings on piston rod.

pistonMark-2

D0AEA markings on the piston rod. D0 = 1970

pistonMark-3

“F” is one of the markings along with an “S” in a shield.

pistonMark-4

Marking “1”

Now I pulled out the right side first (pistons 5-8) as it as the side I happened to have the engine turned over on.   Take a look:

 

 

Although the all of the bearings will be replaced, I do note the ones that aren’t too bad.  This is for documentation and any possible troubleshooting later on.  Here is the removal of the pistons 1-4:


 

So now the pistons are out and we can get a good look at the crank and get pull the cam.

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

projectsportsroof

collectors cars | Tumblr

The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took … Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C …
1973 Mustang – Project SportsRoof – Compression, Rods and Heads

Thanks for check in on #ProjectSportsRoof. If you remember a of couple months back, shortly after bringing the ’73 Mustang home, I conducted a compression test on all the cylinders.  The 351C was running rough (to put it mildly) and smoked like a pile of tires on fire (only the smoke …
collectors cars | Tumblr

The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took … Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C …

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Video 7 – Mains and Pistons Part 2

Welcome back.  This post will show you the removal main bearings for the crank for 351 Cleveland.

You’ll notice that I’ve added some captions correcting some of my theories like there’s seems to be plenty of oil getting around the bearing and the crank.  Of course because it’s happening now, or was happening just before removing the engine that doesn’t mean it’s ‘always’ had oil flowing properly.  Take a good look at the bearing when I remove them and see what you think.

 


I’m going to guess that prior to having the heads being done, based I what I see on the mains, there was some oil issue, rather major oil issues. You recall the valve issue on the #2 cylinder?

Oh!!!!

Oh!!!!

In the next two posts I’ll be removing and taking a look at the pistons and then we’ll inspect the crank, so keep an eye out for those.

Thanks for reading and remember drop me a note.

Tim

HoodPrimer-14

351C Removal and tear down – YouTube

Jul 19, 2016 Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. This the beginning of rebuild of the 351 Cleveland for the 73 Mustang.

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Rebuild – Removal 4 – YouTube

Aug 1, 2016 I’m So close to getting #ProjectSportsRoof engine pulled and starting the tear down.

vintage mustangs | Tumblr

The 351 Cleveland is out of #ProjectSportsRoof. Yeah…I know!! It seemed like to took forever!!! Seems longer since I have driven it in months. Now if you missed …

73 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Video 6 – Mains and Pistons Part 1

We are getting to the good stuff.  We’ll be looking at the bearings, piston, crank and cam in the next few posts.  I’ll be able to determine what was causing the knocking in the bottom end  and  if the 351 Cleveland in #ProjectSportsRoof is going to make it.

So I’m starting with removing the mains.  Now I started early to avoid the heat here in Southern AZ.  Doing so I had to also be a bit considerate of my neighbors. So the garage door is closed as the compressor is loud – and there’s just no good way to loosen the mains while on a stand without an impact wrench or air ratchet.  So I loosened up all the bolts on the mains and fatefully the first set of bolt on piston rod (just to see if I needed the impact wrench).

 

There’s a few of things to keep in mind with contradict a few of my comments during the next few videos. First it seems that the bottom end of the Cleveland has never been apart. The piston rods are original Ford part with the Ford logo and Ford date code (in this case the rod are all “D0” indicated 1970 – which is not a stretch to find them in a 1972 engine) and I’m assuming the piston themselves are as well.  Second is the fact that I haven’t torn an engine apart since in over 35 years so I’m not an expert.  Third, I mention that there appears to have been ample oil flow at the time of tear down, but that might not have always been the case (like when the valve was not operating) – you’ll see the relevance of that qualification coming up.

Coming up in the next post is a good look at the main bearings.

Thanks for reading and drop me your comments and thoughts.  Love to hear from you.

Tim

20160722_165829

Mains and Crank

1973 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Part 1

Aug 13, 2016 Welcome back to the 1973 Mustang project dubbed: #ProjectSportsRoof. We have the 351 Cleveland out and now I’m going to begin …

1973 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Part 3

Thanks for checking back in on the progress on the 1973 Mustang SportsRoof’s 351C tear down.

In the last post I still needed to remove the lifters and the right side head.  To remove the remain head, you have to remove the rockers to get a socket on them.

Also took the time to recheck the push rods, with all the noise coming from the bottom end of the block, you can’t be too careful.

I’ll apologize now for a couple of things.  First the fan noise.  It’s pretty hot here this time of year in southern Arizona and that fan makes it bearable, barley.  But even worse is the compressor noise, so don’t crank up the volume too much.  And finally, if you notice, the captions are a bit higher on the video.  I’m trying to hide the brand name of my BVDs.  Last time readers got a glimpse of the brand, they started sending me their brands to wear on the next video.

 


 As you could see at the end of the video, the cylinder aren’t horrible but not great.  But we’ll look at them a bit closer coming up.

Thanks for checking on #ProjectSportsRoof.

Tim

1973 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Part 1

6 days ago Welcome back to the 1973 Mustang project dubbed: #ProjectSportsRoof. We have the 351 Cleveland out and now I’m going to begin …

1973 Mustang 351 Cleveland Tear Down Part 1

Finally the fun part begins.  Well actually it’s all fun, just varying degrees of it.   Welcome back to the 1973 Mustang project dubbed:  #ProjectSportsRoof.   We have the 351 Cleveland out and now I’m going to begin disassembly and see if we can get to the bottom of the “bottom end noise” it developed.

Here’s the first video.  Don’t be distracted by the Corvette t-shirt from my corvette club, it’s ok to own both!!

 

Here’s a look at one of nuts from the torque stall converter:

They are pretty rounded.

They are pretty rounded.

As you can see I didn’t have you watch as I unbolted the fuel pump or the brackets, even though this is Average Guy’s Car Restoration which equates to average skill set, average tool hoard  and average (or below) budget, but I’m thinking you get the removal of a couple of bolts.  If things get tricky (for me) I’ll cover it.

Next up we get the intake manifold off and heads.

Thanks for check back.

Tim

 

351C finally on the stand!

Classic Cars / Car Projects / Car Shows – Your Car/Truck Projects …

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. With the floor pans welding, sealing and coating finished the next step was to apply the heat and sound barrier. This is …
restorable classic cars | Tumblr

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. I’m getting ready to pull the 351C from between the fenders of the 1973 Mustang SportsRoof for a complete rebuild.