Project BeepBeep – ’68 Road Runner – Drum or Disc – The Decision

1968 Ply Road Runner
Project BeepBeep

Welcome back to #ProjectBeepBeep.  Bill is looking at the brakes and gets some professional assistance to help him make a crucial decision.  You know if you’ve got a lot of GO…you need a lot STOP.

It not an easy decision to alter a car’s originality, especially if it’s not 100% required for safety. So, as Bill has, you need to weight the decision carefully and get some expert opinions.

Here is Bill’s latest video.

 


 

I recall when I restored my 70 Dodge Dart – back in 1977, I wasn’t sure what those springs were that were wrapped around the drums – must guys didn’t put them back on.

More great information in this video.  Thanks for sharing it Bill.

Come up next for Project BeepBeep the conversion process gets started.

Thank for check in @ Average Guy’s Car Restoration, Mods and Racing.  You can us on Twitter @AGCarRestore.

Tim

Introducing #ProjectBeepBeep – Code H 1968 Road Runner

I’d like you to take a look at one of my constant readers classic muscle car. First let me say that Bill has been an a long quest to find a car to replace this car:   Back in the day. It was a long search with lots of phone calls with many …

Project BeepBeep – ’68 RoadRunner – Door Panel Tips

Ready for some more #ProjectBeepBeep?  Bill takes you through a few tips for restoring your B-Body door panels. Take a look:     Great stuff!!!  Thanks Bill!!! Have a few Mopar tips – Post them up or drop me a note @ agcarestoration@cox.net and we get you video/tip posted on the site. Thanks for reading Tim                 Introducing …

Project BeepBeep – A look at the Brakes

Bill takes a look at the heavy-duty brakes that came on the ’68 Road Runner. Bill doesn’t like the stopping power that these give him and even though they are in good shape, he may still upgrade them.     Here are a couple close-ups of those heavy-duty brakes:   That’s some great information on brake …

Project BeepBeep – ’68 Road Runner – Door Update and Power Steering

Welcome back to #ProjectBeepBeep.  Bill is going to stuff a lot into this post, including tools, fire suppression, update on his work with the doors and windows on the 1968 Road Runner and the swapping out the  half a century old power steering hose!!!    These pics show the location and how …

Project BeepBeep’s First Car Show!!

Taking your car to its first (for you) car show is nerve-racking and accelerating at the same time. Bill handles #ProjectBeepBeep well.  Here’s the video.     Congrats Bill! I bet there will be a few more in #ProjectBeepBeep’s future!!! Thanks for reading. Tim   Introducing #ProjectBeepBeep – Code H 1968 Road Runner I’d like you to take …

 

Project BeepBeep – ’68 RoadRunner – Door Panel Tips

Ready for some more #ProjectBeepBeep?  Bill takes you through a few tips for restoring your B-Body door panels.

Take a look:

 

 

Great stuff!!!  Thanks Bill!!!

Have a few Mopar tips – Post them up or drop me a note @ agcarestoration@cox.net and we get you video/tip posted on the site.

Thanks for reading
Tim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introducing #ProjectBeepBeep – Code H 1968 Road Runner

I’d like you to take a look at one of my constant readers classic muscle car. First let me say that Bill has been an a long quest to find a car to replace this car:   Back in the day. It was a long search with lots of phone calls with many …
ProjectBeepBeep – 1968 Road Runner Update Video 2

Thanks for looking back in on #ProjectBeepBeep Bill begins the odyssey. Will he wrangle this Road Runner and show up that old Coyote or will an ACME Anvil be his fate?  Keep up to date by grabbing the RSS feed. Here is Bill’s latest video More coming up the ’68 Road Runner including a …

H.E.M.I. Show – Come, see, and hear, the largest all Mopar show in Arizona.

The H.E.M.I show is back, Saturday, March 7th, 2015. 8 AM -3 PM. Sponsored by Universal Technical Institute and Mopars Unlimited of Arizona. The biggest all Mopar car show in Arizona has a NEW LOCATION. This year the show will be at UTI, Universal Technical Institute, 10695 W. Pierce St, Avondale, AZ 85323.

The H.E.M.I show is back, Saturday, March 7th, 2015. 8 AM -3 PM. UTI, Universal Technical Institute, 10695 W. Pierce St, Avondale, AZ 85323

The H.E.M.I show is back, Saturday, March 7th, 2015. 8 AM -3 PM.
UTI, Universal Technical Institute, 10695 W. Pierce St, Avondale, AZ 85323

 
More space, more vendors, more swappers, food trucks, and over 50 professionally judged classes and all Mopar.

Vintage, Classic, Muscle, Truck, Jeep, FWD, Neon, Prowler/Viper, AMC, new Challenger, Charger, and Dart classes, survivor class, and a display only class plus many more. Stock and modified in most classes.

Personal Touch Dynamometer chassis dyno on site all day. See which Mopar will make the most power at the Dyno challenge. Special award for the highest horse power Mopar.

Come, see, and hear, the largest all Mopar show in Arizona.

Go to moparsaz.com for more info and to register show cars, swappers, and vendors, Just print and mail in the form by February 16th for reduced pre entry fee for show cars.

Entry is free to spectators. Show car $20 pre register by Feb 16th, $25 day of show, $15 Display only, Swap/Vendor space $20/$50, Dyno Challenge $30 2 pulls, enter as often as you like.

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

mopar car show

 

Mopar Fans….LOOK AT THESE!!!!

Ok…I never really liked the look of the original Superbird…..but I have to say….the rear of these look great.  The front I could live with that.

What do you thing?

I think they look great from the back  the wing looks like it belongs there.

I think they look great from the back the wing looks like it belongs there.

Front..I could live with!!!

Front..I could live with!!!

 

Let’s here it!!!!

Tim

mopar superbird

Common Upgrades For An LA318 In A 1971 Dodge Dart Swinger | Street Legal TV

MOPAR fans you are going to love this article.

I use to own a 1970 Dodge Dart with a 318 between the fenders.  I did a lot of body work to the life long New York State car, but nothing to the engine.  There’s one I should have kept, right along with the ’66 Impala, ’70 Chevelle and a couple others!!!

Some great upgrade in this one.

 

Common Upgrades For An LA318 In A 1971 Dodge Dart Swinger | Street Legal TV.

Thanks for reading

Tim

Mopar Door Panel Project – The LeBaron Part 2

Let’s finish up the coverage of this project.

As you as in the Part 1 we ran into some issue with the clue holding on some critical parts of the door panel, like the part that holds up on sub-panel that holds the controls for the window, locks and mirror remote.  Also needing attention was the vent channel that push air to driver’s window to defog it.

I wanted this fixes to be permanent and it was clear that more glue wasn’t going be a long-term fix.  There isn’t much that makes up the door panel, it was only about 1/4″ thick. Now I know it might make folks cringe, but it was necessary, I used very small (short) hobby screw.

Here are some pics:

This first pic is showing the actual problems.

PANEL2The two “A”s are showing the two clips on the back of the brace that accept the male part of the clip from the panel that holds all the controls.  Without begin attached the back of the door panel the control flop around and slide out-of-place.

The “B” and arrow highlight the issue.  There the glue let go and you can see the gap.

IMAG1691

Here you can see the vent channel.  This posed a bit of an issue because the door panel is thin here and on the outside there is a locking ring that is mainly a decorative actually had locking prongs, which as a result of the glue no longer holding fast, broke off and I had to JB Weld them back on.  In this pic you can see one of the screws I used to put every thing back together.

IMAG1684

Here is a close up of the one of the screws.  In the lower left you can see on of the blobs of glue that came loose.

This was a really easy repair, however, we didn’t resolve the window issue.  So we’ll pull the right side door panel and see if we can fix window issue and as long a we’re in there we’ll shore up the braces.

Thanks for reading.  Leave a comment.

Tim

Auto Factoids for Week of 10/14/12

This is a great week in auto history.

On 10/14 back in 1965 Oldsmobile (RIP) debuted one of the most advanced cars it every produced. That car was the Toronado. Front wheel drive and stylish looks made this car in the middle of the muscle car, it held it’s own.   The first year of  production was 1966.  The engine was the  425 topped with  a 4 barrel Rochester 4GC carb.  Its bore and stroke was 4.125 x 3.97 with 10.5:1 compression and lay out 365 hps.  It was a muscle car!!!!

1966 Toronado – Kool factor of 8.5 out of 10.

10/14/24 was a huge day the automotive development time line, but no one actually new it yet. That was the day in Allentown, PA Lee Iacocca was born. Savior of Mopar and instrumental in the success of one of the most important cars in the American auto industry – the Mustang!!!!

1964 Mustang

2013 Mustang

10/16/1958 – Chevy rolls out the El Camino.

1958 – I didn’t like the body styles until the 60’s

1964

Thanks for reading.

Tim

US Cars Overseas – Sweden

Thought I’d share this.  It’s amazing how many and the variety of  US cars made in the 50’s and 60’s made it overseas.  It’s also very interesting what they do with them.  Check out these MOPARs in Sweden.  Way Cool!!!

From:   http://www.streetlegaltv.com/news/a-variety-of-mopars-in-sweden-to-envy/

A Variety Of Mopars In Sweden To Envy

Michael Hardingby on April 23, 2012

You can always tell a car guy by looking in his garage and seeing what he has in there. If you see a couple of cars, that’s could be your first clue. But when you see muscle cars from the 60’s and 70’s, and engines on pallets, car lifts, stickers from internet performance shops, and various parts on the shelves, then you know that garage isn’t the run-of-the-mill garage.

Looking at Anders Ohlin’s garage in Sweden lets you know that this guy is into cars and performance – particularly Mopar performance. His collection of Mopar muscle cars is enough to make you drool.

Anders collection is interesting, and he says that some of his cars are the only ones that he knows of in Sweden. He considers himself a fanatic, as do many of his friends. Just looking at the pictures in his garage and you can see that he likes to surround himself with performance.

Some of his cars include a 1958 DeSoto Fireflite with a 361 Wedge, a 1965 Dodge Coronet A990 Super Stock Clone with a race HEMI that he imported in 2010, a 1964 Dodge 440 that has a 426 Wedge with dual carbs, a 1962 Chrysler 300 Sport Coupe that appears to have a 413 with dual carbs, and also a 1964 Dodge 330 to round out the cars we know of.

You can check out the YouTube video and see him moving his 1964 Dodge 330 around the garage. It’s a very healthy sounding Mopar, and if the deep rumble of that exhaust doesn’t sound like music to your ears, then you need to turn your speakers up!

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

NASCAR Comment

My last post  “Dodge Unveils Next-Gen Sprint Cup Car in Vegas…..” (http://wp.me/pKHNM-ZJ), invoked a few comments mostly on Facebook and at least one here that touched on something that ‘bugs’ me about where NASCAR has gone since the 60’s.

Here is an excerpt from Bill:

“….

I’m bittersweet about manufacturers participation in NASCAR, and have been since TOYOTA wrapped themselves in the American flag and joined the series. If manufacturers are to continue participation, then I would like to see rules such as motor sources must be manufacturer sourced, running pump gas, and back to body templates that must match their street versions.

Back when MOPAR was absent from NASCAR, the ideal was that there just was nothing to gain in NASCAR other than name recognition for Chrysler. Even TOYOTA admitted when they joined NASCAR that there was nothing to gain other than getting their logo on the field….”

In another post I talked about loss of innovation and brand loyalty and I have to expand on and disagree a bit with Bill.

When NASCAR started the templates and restricter plates and began the standardization of the cars that participated, I began loosing interest and a lot of other did as well.  One of the biggest complaints I hear among the fan I sit with during a race and talk to is that the cars a so similar there really isn’t much to the racing part.    Those rules are what killed the major benefits for the manufacturers.   It killed individual innovation.   The cars are now tube framed, bland sheet metal, sticker covered shell of what racing use to be, 200 per hour uninspiring billboards.  Headlights and logos…. STICKERS… people!!!!!

How can these compare?

New Dodge Charger for NASCAR

They don’t compare.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

The Value of 4 Door Collector Cars (And my 500th Post)

This is my 500th post for Average Guy’s Car Restoration, Mods and Racing blog (my one and only blog).  It has become a bit more board in scope than what I originally intended, but if you are a total car nut case, like me (my wife uses the “o’ word)  and have AADD (automobile attention deficit disorder…..HEY..that could be REAL…you don’t know that it’s NOT!!) you want more than just a Chevy or more than just 1950’s cars.  You’ll be drawn to others. (“Drawn” makes it sound like a slow process…but picture a disco era strobe light…yeah that’s a but closer to what I’m trying to describe.)  I’ve moved fairly close to the edge, having a ’70’s car and a 2007 model and mixing technologies and brands, Ford and Chevy. (I need a MOPAR and a Citroen.)

Of course one of the fun things that keeps me blogging are comments, not so many posted here, but a ton on Facebook and Twitter and now even Google+.  I like when a reader’s comment sparks a blog entry instead of just sitting there.  That brings me to the subject of this piece.

Bill is a frequent reader and leaves comments on a regular basis.  In my recent entry on the 1957 DeSoto Adventurer sold at Barrett-Jackson in Scottsdale, last weekend Bill wrote this:

Bill
Submitted on 2012/01/28 at 6:12 pm

DeSoto was Chrysler’s Oldsmobile, and I think it was unappreciated both by the public and Mother Mopar herself.

Back when I lived in San Jose, CA (actually Santa Clara) in the early 1990s, there was a 1957 Adventurer 4 door parked in a driveway with four flat tires in a neighborhood near mine. I think the car had been registered last in 1979. The body, chrome, glass, and even the interior seemed in excellent condition, yet I knew the car needed more than just TLC to become roadworthy. Each time I passed that car I wanted to leave a note and see if I could get it cheap enough to restore.

I know that 4 door DeSotos would not be collectible, or bring the big money, but somehow this car seemed to be in good enough shape that it was worth saving from being just a donor parts car. I’ll be in San Jose on business soon, and will make it a point to drive by and see if the car is still there.

Have a nice day, Bill

It’s true that in the past 4 door versions of classic cars of the 50’s and 60’s lagged as far as pricing and collectivity.  But that is changing.  I as work to finish up my classic car auto appraisal certification, I’m finding that, much like the cars of 1910-1940’s, 2 extra doors aren’t hurting the price they’ll bring. Just take the trend of station wagons – sure at Barrett Jackson’s you’ll only see the two door(plus tailgate) and they’ll bring ‘bigger’ money, but 15 years ago, only crazy people had wagons restored. But the prices for cars like the Pontiac Safari wagon and the Buick Vista Cruiser (Sports wagon) are bringing higher prices. (Actually I think it was Olds Vista Wagon and Buick Sports Wagon.)

58 Safari Wagon

69 Buick Sports Wagon

I’m still quoted as saying that my Mustang, because it’s a coupe and not a fast back or a sports roof, will never to be worth what I’ve spent in restoring it.  Interestingly enough, you can start finding them on the web and Ebay for $16k.  One recently sold for a bit more than that and it to was a 302 with 351 heads and a wing.  So these things are changing.  Publications like Hemmings and others are often recommending the purchase of 4 door 50’s and 60’s cars.  In part because they are well priced and with the after-market bolt ‘ons’ and drop in crate motors, you can take what was originally under powered 4 door and make it a rubber melting monster.

So go get those 4 doors.  Winch them out of the barns and ditches, drag ’em home, restore them back to life and drive ’em!!!!

And I hope that Bill’s DeSoto (see I already have him owning it) is still there and at the least can grab us a few pics.  And if you can get some contact info for the owner, I might add a pre-MOPAR to my driveway.  Thanks for the comment Bill.

Thanks for reading.

Tim