They Made How Many? Chevy 1975

Here’s a little 4TH of July twist for They Made How Many?

What’s more American then a Chevrolet?

Check it out:

 

This was  a 1975 commercial and yes I know that other American cars (but feel free to remind me!!!! ) but this is just so American!!!!

You can see the a Vega, a Caprice, a Monza,  a Nova and few other Chevy’s in the commercial.

Total American car manufacturing show that Chevy was #1 in  car production with 1,755,773 units.  Chevy was followed closely by Ford with 1,569,608, then a distant 3rd was Oldsmobile with 631,795 (Roughly 1 million less than Ford!!).

The rest looked like this:

Pontiac – 531,922                                     Buick – 481,768                                   Plymouth – 454,105

Mercury – 404,650                                  Dodge – 377,462                                  Cadillac – 251,549

AMC – 241,501                                          Lincoln – 101,843                                 Imperial – 8,830

Checker – 450                                            Avanti II – 125                                       Excalibur – 90 (what?)

Out of the 1.7 million cars that Chevy produced there were some highlights.  Take for instance the famous 1975 Cosworth Vega two door hatchback with a total of 2,061 cars produced.

1975_Cosworth_Vega

Number-wise that was a very low production, but did you know the rarest car Chevy produced that year was the unfamous 1975 Vega Panel Express.  Total production was 1,525!!!

 

75Express

 

More coming up on 1975 Chevy production!!!

No shortage of drag racing action

The Electronic Gamblers’s Race came down to a final between the dragster of Mary Roach from Saint John, N.B., and the 1974 Chevy Vega of Rick Nowlan from Moncton, N.B., with Roach emerging victorious. The Junior Dragster class ran two divisions, and …
Benton’s Steve Collier is driven to succeed

Collier, a detective with the Benton Police Department, captured his first national win in Baytown, Texas, in his 1972 Chevy Vega and is now sitting in the top 10 nationally in points. “You have hundreds of racers and you have people out there who’ve

Let me know if you own when of these and drop us a note at:  AGCarRestoration@cox.net

Thanks for reading.

Tim

chevy vega engine

 

Car Feature: Mike Cavanah’s 1966 Chevelle “Grand Sport” – StreetLegalTV.com

Car Feature: Mike Cavanah’s 1966 Chevelle “Grand Sport” – StreetLegalTV.com.

 

This is a very well done car, in my opinion.  Modified just enough to make it a powerful machine and still look like a 1966 Chevelle.  I say ‘WOW”  you will too when you read the article. (see the link above)

The Power Plant And Putting It To The Ground

The motor itself is an LS 418 cubic inch stroker with a Lunati crank and H-Beam rods connected to forged pistons. The top end is comprised of ported LS3 heads with an LS9 supercharger. All the machining and assembly of the motor was performed by Scoggin Dickey out of Texas.  Mated to the motor is a T-56 six speed transmission that’s outfitted with an ACT dual disc clutch to help lay the power down to the pavement. All this equaled out on the dyno to an impressive 600 hp and 650 lb.-ft. of torque at the wheels.

Monster Chevelle

Monster Chevelle

 

Got a monster chevy in the garage?  Project or not…let me hear about it!!

Thanks for reading.

Tim

Chevrolet Chevelle

Chevelle SS: jpg | 1966 Chevelle Malibu Convertible The Chevelle SS396 became a series of its own in 1966 with series/style numbers 13817 and
Chevrolet Malibu

Styling revisions on all 1966 Chevelles including more rounded styling similar to the full-sized Chevrolets with sail panels and tunneled

Curb Weight – 2/27/2013

This is my latest segment.  It will be a frequent blathering of car stuff – current and maybe some old stuff.  I hope you enjoy it.

Bench seats started as the first front seats, clearly a hold over from the old ‘buck-wagon’.  Over the years the  bench was a stable, but has somewhat faded  Well for American cars it comes to an end the last 2013 Impala, which is the last U.S. car and the 2014 Impala will have bucket seats.

'61 Chevy bench seat.

’61 Chevy bench seat.

2014

2012 Impala w/bbench seet and 2014 without

I was really excited to see C-X75 Super Car for Jaguar back in 2010 at the Paris Car show.  The car was to sticker at about 1.1 million dollars. However, it has been killed after just 3 prototyped.

Great Looking from the front.

Great Looking from the front.

 

Space ship?  Maybe it's butt killed it?

Space ship? Maybe it’s butt killed it?

Thanks for reading.

Tim

 

 

 

 

MCACN: 1952 Chevrolet 3600 Pickup Truck

MCACN: 1952 Chevrolet 3600 Pickup Truck.

 

This 1952 Chevrolet 3600 pickup truck was found in a North Dakota farmfield.

To seem more follow the link above to Classic Recollections.

I love the painted dash on this 52 pickup.

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

Ford Shelby GT500 vs Chevrolet Camaro ZL1! – Head 2 Head Episode 11

Here is another compare between the cars.

Breaking seems to be the main issue.

Funny they differ on which car would be better on the street.

Quarter mile was a blow out.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

1991 Camaro

 

What We Drive – Jon’s ’91 Camaro

from:  Prestolite Performance   http://info.prestoliteperformance.com/111-what-we-drive-jon-s-91-camaro.html?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Automotive+Newsletter+7_26_12
Published on Thursday, 26 July 2012 14:55

What We Drive Volume 1, Jon's CamaroMeet Jon, one of our engineers here at Prestolite Performance. He is the focus of our first installment of What We Drive, our series of stories about the cars of Prestolite Performance employees. Jon got into cars when he was about 13 years old. His first car was a 1986 Ford Tempo that he worked on, but never got it to the road. His college car was a 1989 Chevy S10, which he beefed up by replacing the original 4 cylinder with a V8.

How Jon’s Camaro Went From 230 hp to Over 700 hp

Jon had been looking for a ’91 Camaro for some time, finding it difficult to locate one that wasn’t a rust bucket. In 2000, his search paid off and he purchased a nearly bone stock ’91 Camaro with only about 57,000 miles. The only performance upgrade on the car was a Flowmaster exhaust. Originally, the car made about 230 hp and 300 ft. lbs of torque.

The LB9 305 small block Chevy engine that was stock in Jon’s Camaro was removed to make way for a 355 small block. He hand ported aluminum Corvette heads and installed a Holley Stealth Ram intake with Mr. Gasket Ultra-Seal intake gaskets. Jon also made sure his engine was sealed for higher horsepower with Multi-Layered Steel head gaskets from Mr. Gasket. He made the engine even tougher with a forged ZZ4 crank, SRP forged pistons and a Comp camshaft.

Beefing up the drivetrain was also a priority so Jon installed a 4L80E transmission (built to handle 1000hp), Transgo shift kit, Lakewood transmission mount, SPOHN driveshaft, Detroit locker and Lakewood U-joints.

With twin 60mm Garret Turbos and his ACCEL 1000cfm throttle body and ACCEL Gen7 engine management system, Jon needed a hefty fuel delivery. His 5160FI fuel pump (now under Mallory) along with Mallory filters and high performance regulator provides the elite system needed for such a setup. For ignition, Jon used an ACCEL 300+ box with an ACCEL ultra coil and Extreme 9000 ceramic boot wires.

Now that Jon’s Camaro had been beefed up, he needed to harness the power with Lakewood 90/10 drag struts, panhard bar and control arms. He also needed better braking, so he installed 2002 SS Camaro brakes on all 4 corners.

All said and done, Jon’s beefed up ’91 Camaro now makes 700 hp and 800 ft. lbs of torque. That’s quite the improvement from stock.

See more Pictures

Beautiful Car!

Now that’s some plumbing!!!

Complete List of Improvements to Jon’s Camaro

Engine

Drivetrain

Power Adder

  • Twin 60mm Garret Turbos
  • Custom stainless headers

Fuel system

Engine management

Ignition

Exhaust

  • Custom 2-1/2″ down pipes
  • 4″ y-pipe back single exhaust
  • Dynatech muffler
  • Mr. Gasket ultra seal gaskets

Suspension

Brakes

  • 2002 SS Camaro brakes on all 4 corners
 Thanks for reading.
Tim

 

Transitioning to Modern Transmissions Prt 2

Posted By John Katz, June 25, 2012 in E-News, Engine & Drivetrain

From www.hotrodandrestoration.com

Stick Shifting

Meanwhile, manual-shift enthusiasts are upgrading to modern units packing more heavy-duty horsepower capacity—and more gear ratios.

“The generation that is now in their 60s can afford to build the cars that they wanted to build when they were in high school,” said Dick Hill, sales manager for Centerforce Clutches in Prescott, Arizona. And while those folks are not usually looking to build a race car, “they do want a four- or five-speed manual transmission,” he said.

More surprisingly, the trend extends beyond muscle cars and into traditional hot rods as well.

“I have friends who are building Deuce roadsters and they are putting LS motors in them, with a five- or six-speed manual transmission,” Hill said. “There are people who put Cadillac V-8s in 1949–1951 Mercs, and they want a stick. They want a three-pedal car. So that, too, is contributing to the growth of the high-performance clutch market.”

Hot rodders who already own or have owned multiple cars are now looking for something different.

“It’s like the people who buy their first Harley, they want it with every doo-dad they can get, where older bikers are turning back to the Knucklehead or even Flathead motors,” Hill said. “It’s the same with the hot rodder who already has two or three or four toys in the garage. The newest toy is going to be a stick car. And it’s for the same reason that someone will buy a brand-new Camaro, put 1,000 horsepower in it, and drive it on the street while blowing cold air and playing tunes. They want a manual not because they’re going to race it, but because they can have it. That’s what we hear all the time: ‘Because I can.’”

Rating the Ratios

American Powertrain of Cookeville, Tennessee, sells a broad range of high-performance drivetrain components, from complete crate engines to driveshafts and pedals. The company also distributes Tremec transmissions.

“The hot market right now is for the Magnum six-speed in a classic muscle car,” said Gray Frederick. “The Magnum is Tremec’s replacement for the T-56 is the aftermarket version of what you would get in a new Shelby GT500 or Camaro SS.” Frederick added that people are putting them into classic Mustangs Cougars, Camaros Firebirds, Barracudas and Challengers.

“The cars that people spend the most money on are the cars that [are] getting Magnum six-speeds,” Frederick added.

The Magnum is available with two sets of ratios, with the closer-ratio unit being the more popular of the two.

“The wide-ratio box has a 0.5 overdrive, which is very tall; a lot of engines can’t pull that much overdrive,” Frederick said.

But when it comes to overdrive, isn’t more better?

“That’s a myth,” Frederick said. “You can say, ‘Alright, I’m at the ragged edge of my cam, where if I’m on flat ground I can hold 70 mph all day.’ In a perfect world, that would be great. [I]n the real world, at some point you’re going to have to slow down for construction, and then speed up again; or you’re going to hit a rise, or something else that causes your engine to run out of breath. [T]hen you’re going to have to shift and that’s what you’re trying to avoid.

“You want to put it in sixth gear and leave it sixth gear,” he continued. “You don’t want to run down the highway at your cam’s peak performance, which would be 3,000–4,000 rpm. But you do want an rpm where your engine can pull your car up hills, and pass without dropping a gear. If every time you put your foot in the gas the engine lugs and you have to shift, that becomes very inefficient. We’re helping the customer understand that, even on the highway, you want to stay in your powerband. Otherwise the overdrive doesn’t do you any good.”

Frederick recommends the wide-ratio unit mostly for torquey big blocks.

“A Pontiac 455 will pull a stump out of the ground at 800 rpm; it doesn’t have trouble pulling a car at whatever rpm you’re running,” he said. “A Mopar 440 and some other big blocks with a lot of low-end grunt can usually handle the taller overdrive, too. And of course we’re dealing with a lot of electronically fuel-injected (EFI) engines now, and most of them have computers that can cope with low rpm very well.

They can retard the spark, they can meter the fuel differently, they can do all kinds of things.

“We help the customer choose a rearend ratio and a gear set that’s going to give them the best performance, from top to bottom,” Frederick said.

Pedal Pressure Another concern, according to Hill of Centerforce Clutches, is the physical effort once associated with a high-performance clutch.

“Our customers all ask, ‘How stiff is the pedal?’” he said. “That’s why we’ve been very successful, whether it’s a single-disc clutch for mild upgrade vehicle, or dual-disc unit that can hold 1,300 lbs./ft. of torque, we’ve been very successful in making them streetable.”

The average consumer, Hill said, could climb into a car with a Centerforce dual-disc clutch, push the pedal to the floor, and not realize that the car was modified.

“[T]he person who has a $75,000 Camaro or Corvette wants race-car performance without the race-car effort, so this is pretty significant,” he said.

Still, selecting the optimal clutch for any particular application is a complex task best left to experts.

“There are different linings and different friction materials on the pressure plate,” Hill said. “Heat is a factor. The first thing you have to know is how the vehicle is going to be used. Drag racers realize they are going to drive their car until they break it, where hot rodders don’t beat their cars up as bad. They are very proud of their cars and they want to drive them, not break them. And unless the car has been tubbed, a street machine generally runs smaller tires, so you want to tune the clutch for that.”

McLeod Racing of Placentia, California, offers its RST and RXT Street Twin clutches, both double-disc units that hold up to 1,000 horsepower, with the pedal pressure of a stock clutch, said President Paul Lee. Contributing to this low effort—and to easier installation—are McLeod’s hydraulic release bearings, “which fit most applications, replacing worn and/or outdated mechanical linkages,” he said.

“We’re selling more clutches for vehicles from the 1960s and 1970s, and installing a new hydraulic clutch in one of these cars can significantly reduce pedal effort,” said Rich Barsamian, national sales manager for Advanced Clutch Technology (ACT) in Lancaster, California. The company also offers a wide range of clutches for GM, Ford and Mopar applications, each rated for torque at the crankshaft.

When installing an aftermarket clutch, Barsamian suggested, “be sure to use the right amount of lube on the input shaft—it is possible to use too much. Be sure parts are free from dirt and oil, and washed in a non-petroleum-based cleaner such as acetone, alcohol or brake cleaner. Be sure to follow the correct torque and tightening sequence when installing the clutch cover—and do not use impact tools.”

Thanks for reading Part 3 coming up.