1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Welding

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof.  Floor pan are ready to be welded into place on the 1973 Mustang Sportsroof.

Now I’m not a welder and there was no way I was going to experiment on the Mustang.  So I enlisted the assistance of my neighbor Dan Thomas.  Dan is quite the artist with his welding and metal work and although this build didn’t require much fancy design work…just quality welds and Dan delivered.

The goal here is to tack the fitted metal patch panels in place.  The welds need to be strong and in the proper places.   Now you might say, “Hey did you say that the Mustang is a unit-body and that the floor needed to be strong since that’s what holds the car together – mostly?”  Yes that is true, however this Mustang will have frame connectors added to make this reasonable.

Just a note about the welding, you have to use gas with the mig…the metal for the patch panels are not that thick and the portions of the floor you are welding it to are old…so you need the added gas.

To start with I needed to strip the tack locations down to bare metal.  You can see some of that in this image.

PreWelding-1

Here a little video clip of the work.  Note: Don’t adjust your device’s volume….there is no sound on the first part of the video…well there was, but it was mostly me chewing gum…not very cool to listen too.

Here is some of Dan’s most excellent work.

LtWelded-1 RtWElded-1
RtWelded-2 RtWelded-3
Weldpic1 Weldpic2
WeldPic3 Thanks Dan!!!

Thanks for following along with the project.  Drop me any questions, comments and/or your thoughts!!!! Coming up next is the coating of the floor and the heat and sound barrier.

Tim

STangATWork

Stang at work!

 

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Part Four …

Apr 19, 2016 Finishing up the right side rear foot-well on #ProjectSportsRoof.

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1973 Mustang – Project Sports Roof – Pertronix Ignitor Update

Well win some and you lose some.  If you’ve seen my other posts related the replacement of the points and condenser for the 351C you’ll notice that I gave conversion high marks.  This was all based on the years of use I got out of the conversion I did on …

Good Guys Car Show 2015 Scottsdale, Az Videos

If you picked up my Twitter feed (@AGCarRestore) you would have seen a great cross-section of the cars and activities going on as they occurred in Scottsdale last weekend.  Below are the a few short videos that give you a feel of the activities and over the next few post, I’ll share some ‘most excellent’ cars.

 

 

 

Great sights and sounds.

 

 

 View of the Autocross pit.

Staging

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

IF YOU LOVE CAR ART, CHECK OUT THE PRINTS FOR SALE BY LOCAL ARTISTS. CHASE THE LINK: CAR ART FOR SALE

 

 

good guys car showgood guys car show

Hot Rods on Display at Good Guys Car Show

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Hundreds of car enthusiasts put their favorite rides on display at the Kansas Speedway on Sunday. Randy Paxton says there’s almost nothing like a day spent in his fully rebuilt ’68 convertible Camero cruisin’ in a car show. “Looks

Wrecked – 1960 Pontiac Catalina

1960 Pontiac Catalina on Parting Out

1960 Pontiac Catalina

Yes you can build a Camaro from the ground of with new frames/bodies and parts everywhere.  You can clone a Boss 302 and you can build your own 1957 Chevy and find all the after market parts you need.

But there are other, equally cool cars that you might take a fancy too and want to restore.  Finding stuff can be a problem.  My new feature “Wrecked” might help you out with finding those parts.

I’m doing this in conjunction with listing on PartingOut.Com  they pull together a lot of cars and many are southwestern cars, that means less debilitating rest on the parts you need.  And that’s were I found this very near completed parts car.

This 1960’s workhorse has great lines and I love stations wagons.  So here’s info on why I think it would be one of those cool cars, you might want too own.

There were about 34,000 of these cars produced in either the a 4 door 6 passenger or 9 passenger.  There were a few AmbleWagons produced out of that lot. (oh…amblewagons were ambulances or hearses).

This is a '69 but you get the idea.

This is a ’69 but you get the idea.

One really cool feature was that, unlike may wagons of the late ’50’s early ’60’s that sported 6 cyclinders engines, the 1960 Pontiac wagons only carried a V8.  That was the 389, overhead valved, cast iron blocked engine, with a bore and stroke of 4.05×3.75 inches and a compression ratio of 8.6:1.  These were topped with Rochester 2GC, 2 barrel, it also sported hydraulic valves and Five main bearings.  This all helped produce from 215 hp (w/synchromesth transmission) or 283 hp (w/Hyrda-Matic transmission).

This was a new body design and new for 1960 were the optional “eight lug” aluminum wheels with integral brake drums that not only enhanced the car’s looks but also provided improved stopping power. Another popular option for performance enthusiasts was the “Safe-T-Track” limited slip differential.

It looks great in this configuration.  Look at alll that glass!!!

It looks great in this configuration. Look at all that glass!!!

And tons room!!!

And tons room!!!

I would love to own one. The potential for making it a Muscle Wagon is extremely good.

So check out www.PartingOut.com and see what parts they have for your collectible.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

 

 

 

 

Mopar Door Panel Project – The LeBaron Part 2

Let’s finish up the coverage of this project.

As you as in the Part 1 we ran into some issue with the clue holding on some critical parts of the door panel, like the part that holds up on sub-panel that holds the controls for the window, locks and mirror remote.  Also needing attention was the vent channel that push air to driver’s window to defog it.

I wanted this fixes to be permanent and it was clear that more glue wasn’t going be a long-term fix.  There isn’t much that makes up the door panel, it was only about 1/4″ thick. Now I know it might make folks cringe, but it was necessary, I used very small (short) hobby screw.

Here are some pics:

This first pic is showing the actual problems.

PANEL2The two “A”s are showing the two clips on the back of the brace that accept the male part of the clip from the panel that holds all the controls.  Without begin attached the back of the door panel the control flop around and slide out-of-place.

The “B” and arrow highlight the issue.  There the glue let go and you can see the gap.

IMAG1691

Here you can see the vent channel.  This posed a bit of an issue because the door panel is thin here and on the outside there is a locking ring that is mainly a decorative actually had locking prongs, which as a result of the glue no longer holding fast, broke off and I had to JB Weld them back on.  In this pic you can see one of the screws I used to put every thing back together.

IMAG1684

Here is a close up of the one of the screws.  In the lower left you can see on of the blobs of glue that came loose.

This was a really easy repair, however, we didn’t resolve the window issue.  So we’ll pull the right side door panel and see if we can fix window issue and as long a we’re in there we’ll shore up the braces.

Thanks for reading.  Leave a comment.

Tim

1958 Ford Ranch Wagon- Control valve rebuilt

 

http://ranchwagon.wordpress.com/2012/05/13/control-valve-rebuilt/

Posted: May 13, 2012 in Uncategorized

So I spent Friday night dismantling the control valve, in order to soak it all overnight for a Saturday morning rebuild. It all came apart relatively easy. After having it all soak all night in some super clean, I cleaned it all up an then soaked all the internals and housing in some power steering fluid. I rebuilt the valve with a rebuild kit and a new ball stud kit as well. Then I coated the spool valve spring and nut with some white lithium grease and installed the end cap.

I then painted it in some chassis black semi-gloss and installed the stud boot and retainer. All done!

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

 

Transitioning to Modern Transmissions Prt 2

Posted By John Katz, June 25, 2012 in E-News, Engine & Drivetrain

From www.hotrodandrestoration.com

Stick Shifting

Meanwhile, manual-shift enthusiasts are upgrading to modern units packing more heavy-duty horsepower capacity—and more gear ratios.

“The generation that is now in their 60s can afford to build the cars that they wanted to build when they were in high school,” said Dick Hill, sales manager for Centerforce Clutches in Prescott, Arizona. And while those folks are not usually looking to build a race car, “they do want a four- or five-speed manual transmission,” he said.

More surprisingly, the trend extends beyond muscle cars and into traditional hot rods as well.

“I have friends who are building Deuce roadsters and they are putting LS motors in them, with a five- or six-speed manual transmission,” Hill said. “There are people who put Cadillac V-8s in 1949–1951 Mercs, and they want a stick. They want a three-pedal car. So that, too, is contributing to the growth of the high-performance clutch market.”

Hot rodders who already own or have owned multiple cars are now looking for something different.

“It’s like the people who buy their first Harley, they want it with every doo-dad they can get, where older bikers are turning back to the Knucklehead or even Flathead motors,” Hill said. “It’s the same with the hot rodder who already has two or three or four toys in the garage. The newest toy is going to be a stick car. And it’s for the same reason that someone will buy a brand-new Camaro, put 1,000 horsepower in it, and drive it on the street while blowing cold air and playing tunes. They want a manual not because they’re going to race it, but because they can have it. That’s what we hear all the time: ‘Because I can.’”

Rating the Ratios

American Powertrain of Cookeville, Tennessee, sells a broad range of high-performance drivetrain components, from complete crate engines to driveshafts and pedals. The company also distributes Tremec transmissions.

“The hot market right now is for the Magnum six-speed in a classic muscle car,” said Gray Frederick. “The Magnum is Tremec’s replacement for the T-56 is the aftermarket version of what you would get in a new Shelby GT500 or Camaro SS.” Frederick added that people are putting them into classic Mustangs Cougars, Camaros Firebirds, Barracudas and Challengers.

“The cars that people spend the most money on are the cars that [are] getting Magnum six-speeds,” Frederick added.

The Magnum is available with two sets of ratios, with the closer-ratio unit being the more popular of the two.

“The wide-ratio box has a 0.5 overdrive, which is very tall; a lot of engines can’t pull that much overdrive,” Frederick said.

But when it comes to overdrive, isn’t more better?

“That’s a myth,” Frederick said. “You can say, ‘Alright, I’m at the ragged edge of my cam, where if I’m on flat ground I can hold 70 mph all day.’ In a perfect world, that would be great. [I]n the real world, at some point you’re going to have to slow down for construction, and then speed up again; or you’re going to hit a rise, or something else that causes your engine to run out of breath. [T]hen you’re going to have to shift and that’s what you’re trying to avoid.

“You want to put it in sixth gear and leave it sixth gear,” he continued. “You don’t want to run down the highway at your cam’s peak performance, which would be 3,000–4,000 rpm. But you do want an rpm where your engine can pull your car up hills, and pass without dropping a gear. If every time you put your foot in the gas the engine lugs and you have to shift, that becomes very inefficient. We’re helping the customer understand that, even on the highway, you want to stay in your powerband. Otherwise the overdrive doesn’t do you any good.”

Frederick recommends the wide-ratio unit mostly for torquey big blocks.

“A Pontiac 455 will pull a stump out of the ground at 800 rpm; it doesn’t have trouble pulling a car at whatever rpm you’re running,” he said. “A Mopar 440 and some other big blocks with a lot of low-end grunt can usually handle the taller overdrive, too. And of course we’re dealing with a lot of electronically fuel-injected (EFI) engines now, and most of them have computers that can cope with low rpm very well.

They can retard the spark, they can meter the fuel differently, they can do all kinds of things.

“We help the customer choose a rearend ratio and a gear set that’s going to give them the best performance, from top to bottom,” Frederick said.

Pedal Pressure Another concern, according to Hill of Centerforce Clutches, is the physical effort once associated with a high-performance clutch.

“Our customers all ask, ‘How stiff is the pedal?’” he said. “That’s why we’ve been very successful, whether it’s a single-disc clutch for mild upgrade vehicle, or dual-disc unit that can hold 1,300 lbs./ft. of torque, we’ve been very successful in making them streetable.”

The average consumer, Hill said, could climb into a car with a Centerforce dual-disc clutch, push the pedal to the floor, and not realize that the car was modified.

“[T]he person who has a $75,000 Camaro or Corvette wants race-car performance without the race-car effort, so this is pretty significant,” he said.

Still, selecting the optimal clutch for any particular application is a complex task best left to experts.

“There are different linings and different friction materials on the pressure plate,” Hill said. “Heat is a factor. The first thing you have to know is how the vehicle is going to be used. Drag racers realize they are going to drive their car until they break it, where hot rodders don’t beat their cars up as bad. They are very proud of their cars and they want to drive them, not break them. And unless the car has been tubbed, a street machine generally runs smaller tires, so you want to tune the clutch for that.”

McLeod Racing of Placentia, California, offers its RST and RXT Street Twin clutches, both double-disc units that hold up to 1,000 horsepower, with the pedal pressure of a stock clutch, said President Paul Lee. Contributing to this low effort—and to easier installation—are McLeod’s hydraulic release bearings, “which fit most applications, replacing worn and/or outdated mechanical linkages,” he said.

“We’re selling more clutches for vehicles from the 1960s and 1970s, and installing a new hydraulic clutch in one of these cars can significantly reduce pedal effort,” said Rich Barsamian, national sales manager for Advanced Clutch Technology (ACT) in Lancaster, California. The company also offers a wide range of clutches for GM, Ford and Mopar applications, each rated for torque at the crankshaft.

When installing an aftermarket clutch, Barsamian suggested, “be sure to use the right amount of lube on the input shaft—it is possible to use too much. Be sure parts are free from dirt and oil, and washed in a non-petroleum-based cleaner such as acetone, alcohol or brake cleaner. Be sure to follow the correct torque and tightening sequence when installing the clutch cover—and do not use impact tools.”

Thanks for reading Part 3 coming up.

Part and Parcel: State of the Swap

http://www.oldcarsweekly.com

Each July the tiny town of Iola, Wis., is invaded by a sea of humanity and old iron. Many in attendance come strictly for the swap meet, which covers about 4,500 spaces.

Old car hobby doing well — at least ‘parts’ of it

By John Gunnell

“Don’t tell me there’s no recovery going on,” said Kurt Kelsey, an Iowa City-based vendor of new-old-stock Pontiac parts. According to Kelsey, his business this year is much better than it has been in a long time. “The phone has been ringing off the hook every day,” he said.

Kelsey’s observation about an up-tick in the market isn’t alone. Positive reports have come from other vendors, parts manufacturers and catalog retailers since late last fall. Despite an unsettled national economy and high unemployment, the old-car parts business seems to be in the midst of a boom.

During a Dynamat seminar at the Hot Rod & Restoration Show in March, company owner Scott Whitaker said one-day shipping of Dynamat automotive insulation products has been impossible to promise lately, because a large increase in orders has outpaced new hiring. “The bump in sales wasn’t expected and caught us off guard,” he said.

In early April, Bob Marx at Marx Parts in Arpin, Wis., came to visit us and he, too, was upbeat about his rising sales. Marx has been growing his inventory of vintage gaskets and rear main seals and is now rebuilding fuel pumps, but he said that new products do not explain all of the growth he is seeing. Like several other industry veterans, Marx pointed to the TV exposure of the Mecum and Barrett-Jackson auctions as a factor that’s helping the hobby grow. “New people are getting involved with old cars,” he said.

“After a winter of inactivity, old cars tend to leak or fail when they are put back on the road,” said Fred Kanter of Kanter Auto Products, who wonders if the business boom might be seasonal. “March, April, May every year, it’s the same thing — spring,” Kanter said. He pointed out that from spring through summer every year, his most popular items are fuel pumps and water pumps. “There’s a lot of factors that affect our business.”

You never know what you’ll see at big swap meets. You might come across a 1958 Edsel Pacer looking for a new home.

Al Suehring of Amherst Junction, Wis., specializes in ring gears and is another vendor who feels that the market is strong. We caught up with him at the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America dinner in Chilton, Wis., and he said that his business from the United States and abroad has been showing noticeable increases lately.

Ray Yager of Classic Industries said the level of growth of reproduction parts sales is “hard to keep up with.” His firm supplies MoPar, 1955-’57 Chevy, Camaro, Firebird, Nova, Impala and Chevy truck parts, and parts sales for these vehicles are moving in a positive direction. Yager thought the company’s 18-month-old MoPar parts catalog may account for some, but not all, of the huge increase in business he’s seeing. At least one vendor who solely deals in Chevrolets is likewise seeing increases in business.

“I’m having a really good year,” said Ron Kellogg of Chevy Tri-Power. “Rather amazing since I’m selling restored multi-carb setups in an era of $5-a-gallon gas prices. I’ve probably sold 25 Tri-Power units — normally a year’s worth — since November 2011.”

Kellogg’s increase proves that car collectors still want high-performance options on their classics.

In addition to new products, increased TV exposure of the hobby and added catalogs, parts suppliers said both the use of the Internet and increased advertising seem to be attracting more customers. Some big companies such as Mid America Motorworks and Eastwood have begun sending daily e-mails to thousands of potential customers. This takes time and money and employees with Internet skills, but their efforts are paying off with increased sales.

Many mom-and-pop operations that can’t afford daily e-marketing efforts are creating websites, Facebook pages, blogs and Twitter accounts to reach the marketplace. Hobby events aimed at professionals — such as the Racing & Performance Expo, the British Motor Trade Association and the SEMA Show — all offer seminars on Internet marketing techniques to these businesses.

As their marketing efforts become more sophisticated, parts sellers are also discovering that they can use print media to drive customers to their websites. Companies that never ran a print ad before are discovering that a clean-looking space ad with the right design and not much text can generate strong client interaction. The right picture of a car can catch the potential customer’s attention and a simple e-mail address or website link is all that’s needed to bring business knocking. A good ad will pay for itself much faster these days.

While an increase in parts sales would suggest that restoration shops and collector car sales are both on the increase, growth in those parts of the hobby isn’t as clear-cut as it is when a part is “checked out” in an online catalog. Collector car dealers such as Colin Comer of Colin’s Classic Auto in Milwaukee and market players such as Joe Bortz are fairly universal in the belief that collector car prices are off 15-20 percent in today’s market. Some restoration shop owners say that they are busier than they’ve ever been, but others say the opposite.

From all of the indications we have seen and all the comments we’ve heard, it appears the old-car parts niche is improving for 2012 and this trend will presumably filter down to other parts of the hobby. The hobby is changing in many ways, and the wise businessmen in it are getting more sophisticated as the market grows.

Sources mentioned

Kurt Kelsey
NOS Pontiac parts
641-648-9086

Dynamat
automotive insulation products
www.dynamat.com
513-860-5094

Marx Parts
vintage gaskets
www.marxparts.com
715-652-2405

Kanter Auto Products
mechanical components
www.kanter.com
800-526-1096

Al Suehring
ring gears
715-677-3809

Classic Industries
restoration parts
www.classicindustries.com
714-847-6887

Ron Kellogg
most tri-power units
www.chevytripower.com

Joe Bortz
vintage vehicle sales
www.takeyourcartoauction.com
847-668-2004

Mid America Motorworks
Corvette and VW restoration parts
www.mamotorworks.com
866-350-4543

Eastwood
restoration equipment
www.eastwood.com
800-343-9353

Colin’s Classic Auto
vintage vehicle sales
www.colinsclassicauto.com
414-964-3747

Car Swap Meet Gems

It’s not that often that I get out to a car swap meet.  Here in Arizona you are in  for a hot time…tempature-wise, do to the lack of shade.  Car parts so hot you’ve got to have oven mitts to handle ’em.  But the are still fun.

Down the street at the local drag strip they had one this weekend and I thought I’d pass on a few of the gems they had for sale.  There was a bit of a car show there as well.

You could pick-up some ‘Field Fresh’ projects like this coupe:

 

“Trailer Not Include”read the sign

 

Love the rear window

The floors are solid.

 

$3500 and the cob web are no extra charge.

 

 

Or this Pick-Up:

You could also find some project that the owner just couldn’t finish…some with some very extensive ‘restoration damage’  like tons of bondo holding the fender together.

This Chevy wasn’t the worst, but it had a lot of bondo.

This Dodge pickup wasn’t horrible. It would make a nice starter project.

This Plymouth Barracuda was pretty stripped down.

I actually think the owner had a lot of the parts laying on the ground for sale separately.

This ’65 Chevy is has been lowered and that’s about all.

Lot work left on this project.

Some cars did find new homes:

This Dodge found a new home.

This Imperial looks like it’s going to its new garage under its own power.

 

I love this car!!!!

Going to need some interior work. This one sported the push button shifting.

 

Coming up… some of the show cars.  Some nice rods.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

Barrett-Jackson and Karl Kustom Corvettes

Not only is there a ton of beautiful cars at Barrett-Jackson auctions, there are also a lot of venders.  Anything from car care products, to engine builders to custom building shops.

One of those was Karl Kustom Corvettes located in Des Moines, Ia.  I had a chance to speak with Jim Hidy one of the reps for Karl Kustom at the auction this past January.

SWEET!!!!

 

Nice looking car, yes?  HELL YES.  But there some interesting things I didn’t know about these custom Vettes and how they are made.

I spoke with Jim at length and I have to tell you that how I thought these were made wasn’t even close and how they are made was pretty surprising to me.  Jim set me straight.

Great Creation

 

These are of course C6 machines with the look of the  60’s Vettes.  All the great handling and power of the C6 underpinning and classic looks.  I thought ‘how cool they manufacture a body that snaps on the C6 frame.  But that’s not how it’s done.

More coming up in Part 2.

Thanks for reading.

Tim