Project SportsRoof – 73 Mustang – Getting in Gear with the Transmission Part 2

 

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof.  I’m finishing the re-positioned shifting rod above the transmission’s cross member.

 

 

 

Next I’ll need to go top side and give the selector a try.  If that is working properly, hitting the proper gears I can spin the torque converter and properly torque its connection to the flex plate.

More coming up.

Tim

projectsportsroof

1973 Mustang – Engine Bay Work

If you look back at #ProjectSportsRoof post you’ll see the condition engine bay.  During those videos I mentioned that I was going to clean it up and hit it with a rattle can.  Again this isn’t going to be a concours restoration, it’s going to look nice and it’s going …
1973 Mustang – Project SportsRoof – Compression Test Part I

I’ve done all the clean up and all the adjustments necessary to get a good reading on the health of the ’72 351C engine in my 1973 Mustang. The next step is to check the compression. First up was to warm the car a bit and then pull the plugs. Here’s what the …
1973 Mustang – Project SportsRoof – Compression Test Part II

This is the wrap up on the compression testing for the 1973 Mustang w/ a 1972 351 Cleveland power plant. You’ll might have notices that I referred to the remote tester, which is my code for remote starter…yeah…that’s it!!! All of these tests were dry test and I should have done a …

 

Project SportsRoof – 73 Mustang Distributor Install

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof.  I’m moving ever closer to getting her back on the road.  Popped the distributor in recently.  Take a quick look.

 

Of course the 351C will need to be timed but I think I have this close enough so it will at least start when I’m ready to fire it up.

I have a bit more transmission work to do, I’ll show you the status in the next post.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

projectsportsroof

1973 Mustang – Engine Bay Work

If you look back at #ProjectSportsRoof post you’ll see the condition engine bay.  During those videos I mentioned that I was going to clean it up and hit it with a rattle can.  Again this isn’t going to be a concours restoration, it’s going to look nice and it’s going …

1973 Mustang – Project SportsRoof – Engine Bay Components.

I thought I’d take a minute and catch the readers up on #ProjectSportsRoof. I wanted to touch up some of the engine bay components, horns, vacuum canister and battery tray.  I didn’t want to alter some of these too much, I like having the numbers, logos and other info visible, not …

Let’s Admit It: Manual Transmissions Need to Go

You just have to read the entire article and then seem my comments.

I make no judgement (like some of the other commenters) on whether Aaron is a “real car guy”, in fact I’m sure he is a ‘car guy’ – just one of ‘THOSE’ car guys. (If you are a real car guy you’ll know what I mean).

Courtesy of BMW By Aaron Miller @aaron_m_miller

 

I’m going to take a lot of heat for what I’m about to say. While no manufacturer can expressly admit it, behind closed doors, deep within the bunkers in Detroit, Munich, Stuttgart, and Tokyo, most engineers will nod in agreement. With enough soul searching, quite a few of my fellow automotive writers will find themselves agreeing, too. The visceral allure of the manual transmission as we know and love it isn’t….

Source: Let’s Admit It: Manual Transmissions Need to Go

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

07 and 73

07 and 73

 

 

 

Why Is Paddle Shift Killing the Manual Transmission, and is it a good thing?

I’m a bit old school about driving like feeling the road (yeah even the pot holes!!) and not floating, making a car hit the curve just right and shoving the clutch pedal to the floor and find the next gear! That’s all part of the enjoyment for me. But paddle shifting is here to stay and I’ll be disappointed if the clutch pedal disappears from all new cars.

I’m sharing this article from Mind Over Motor as it hits on some key points I can relate too when it comes to this “new fangled”  🙂  way of changing gears.

 

Mind Over Motor

I am someone who has publicly lamented the decline of the manual transmission. But I’m also someone who has enjoyed the merits of modern paddle shift gearboxes in many cars.

I find myself very much split on this issue, so lets take a look at the various reasons why shifter paddles are replacing a gear lever and a third pedal in some of our favorite cars.

Note: To clear this up right away, by “paddle shift” I mean cars with automated manual gearboxes, either dual-clutch or single-clutch. I am in no way talking about anything like a Toyota Camry with the “sport package”, which has paddle shifters as a marketing gimmick.

1. More versatile on the road. (Having your cake and eating it too)

If you had something like a Lamborghini Diablo back in the mid 1990s chances are you had a lot of fun out on the open road. However, when you got into town and hit traffic, the heavy clutch made driving the car more of a $250,000 chore than an enjoyable way to spend a weekend afternoon. Considering the average speed of traffic on most roads is around 25-30mph, you’d be spending far more time putting along slowly than stretching the car’s legs. It’s a wonder why most owners hardly ever drove their exotic cars.

Today, Lamborghini only offers their cars with a paddle shift transmission. The sales numbers spoke for themselves, once paddle shift was offered back around 2004, demand for manual Lambos simply fell off.

Paddle shift basically solved all the issues described above with the Diablo. Now, in an Aventador, you can rip your way into town and then just put the car in automatic mode when you hit traffic. You have a car that is a ferocious supercar when you want one, but is also just as easy to drive as a Toyota Camry when you don’t. You are no longer writing a six-figure check to put yourself through misery. And I agree, that is a major plus, especially in cars that had very difficult manual gearboxes like most supercars did.

Chase the link below for the rest of the article and come back and let me know what YOU think!!

Thanks for reading

Tim

Source: Why Is Paddle Shift Killing the Manual Transmission, and is it a good thing?

 

 

Maserati

Maserati

Ferrari

Ferrari

 

 

Paddle Shifting the 997 | Autometrics Motorsports

Paddle Shifting the 997. Porsche 997 GT3 Cup Paddle Shifter. Created by Holinger, supplier of gearbox components to Porsche AG, this paddle shift system is designed specifically for the 997 GT3 Cup, replaces the tunnel-mounted sequential …
Agency Power’s Makes Paddle Shifting Look Good – Vivid …

Paddle shifters are the ultimate “cool factor” of a car. For people who experience paddle shifting for the first time, you might as well be Mario Andretti. They look super cool on the car, and are functionally genius. However, there …
2016 Cadillac ATS-V: A Track-Ready Cadillac? You Bet!

The automatic features several shift modes, as well as manual paddle-shifting, and the manual transmission features automatic rev-matching for drivers who haven’t yet mastered the heel-toe shift method, and it has a no-lift shift feature allowing you
Test Drive: 2015 Audi Q3 Quattro Technik

Nestled in the engine compartment is Audi’s familiar, silky-smooth direct-injected 2.0L TFSI turbocharged four-cylinder engine, mated to a traditional six-speed automatic transmission with Tiptronic paddle shifting. The engine churns out 200 horsepower

Remanufactured, NOS, OEM, Rebuilt and Used Auto Parts

When you are restoring a car you have a lot of choice to make.  Keep the original paint or engine? Drop it a couple of inches? Upgrade the suspension?   Of course there’s the brain racking choice of the what time of necessary parts shop for as well.  Do we go with NOS?  How about OEM, used or remanufactured parts or rebuilt?   These last two question important, however you are going to need to know what the differences are between them.

NOS is New Old Stock and not normally pronounced as a word, just initials  N.O.S.  These initials normally refer to parts that were made by the car’s manufacturer (like GM, Ford, Chrysler) and are stocked at dealerships or auto parts stores while the cars are ‘current’ in marketplace.  Finding NOS parts for you 1930’s Studebaker is a huge deal, provided the parts lasted sitting in the box for 30 plus years.  Automobilia collectors get down right giddy if they find a spark plug for a Model T in the original box – so there’s that aspect.   But many car collectors will look for these parts when on a car when buying and selling.  So NOS is not always going to get the job done if you want a great running classic car and you can almost bet that some are budget busters!

Ford NOS Spark Plugs

Ford NOS Spark Plugs

NOS Thunderbird Windshield wiper motor

NOS Thunderbird Windshield wiper motor

That’s why, in part, all the other classification of parts now exist.

Let’s look at the  remanufactured classification of parts.  The idea is that the parts are as close to new as possible. Any of the parts that might wear have been replaced (normally as standard procedure) and the core material is thoroughly gone over to see if it measures up to original equipment specifications and therefore perform as you would expect original equipment to perform.  The replaced components of the part (seals, springs, gaskets, etc.) should be made in the same process as the original parts were produced and those too should be test against original specs.  This goes for something as small as a distributor caps to a complete short or long block engines.  You’ll  find prices will often cost less than NOS parts and will carry a warranty, which most of other categories do not.

Another classification that is often confused with remanufactured is ‘rebuilt’ parts.   Rebuilding parts includes thorough cleaning and inspection.  Parts that are worn (and not capable of meeting manufacturers’ acceptable wear limits) or broken are replaced.  Anything serviceable is retained.   This leads to a combination of used components (from a core unit), new components (gaskets, washer, etc.) and original.  Quality is an issue and will vary between different rebuilders and sometimes  even from the same rebuilder.  Rebuilt part do come with a “limited” warranty.  Just in case “core unit” isn’t a  familiar phrase, it is basically your old part handed in for a rebuilt part.  Often the cost of the rebuilt part has a ‘core’ charge attached.  For example, when purchasing a rebuilt alternator, the price of $150.00 includes a $25.00 core charge, meaning if you turn in your malfunctioning part the part cost $125.00.  In turn the company uses your core for rebuilding or salvaging parts for another rebuild.

Original Equipment Manufacturer or OEM classification of parts can be confusing as well.   OEM’s were companies that produced parts for the auto manufactures.  For example GM didn’t produce its own batteries, they looked to Delco or some other expert to produce these parts.  You may still be able to buy a battery from Delco, however it may be cosmetically different (which sets it apart from NOS parts.).   In some cases the manufacturers will license a company to produce parts to their specification.

Used parts is the last classification we going to discuss.   Just as you might expect, these are parts most often obtained at a salvage yard.  There the parts may or may not have been tested and there is no quality control.  As you  may have guessed, used parts of often less expensive than the other classifications, but they are not covered by any particular warranty.

Salvage yard part - untested and as is.

Salvage yard parts – untested and as is.

Determining which classification of parts to select from depend on several factors.  What is the end goal for the car?  Concourse restoration, race and show, racing only, just a good-looking classic or muscle car to woo the neighbors and cruse the streets.  What is the budget?  The average guy has average skills, average tools and an average guy’s budget constraints (family, bills, etc.) this may determine the level of restoration you can afford.  Is the need part available? It is great to start out with the goal of restoring to 100% original but if the NOS parts are not available, then what?

In my last restoration (1970 Mustang) I used all manner of parts.  NOS parts from online, used brackets for the A/C compressor (from a Mercury), OEM parts from overseas and rebuilt 4 speed trans from a wrecked Shelby Mustang and a new intake and carb.  This car turned out great and it was raced and woo’ed over and even brought home a couple of car show trophies.

Enjoy the hobby and thanks for reading.

Tim

_JKP2735-1970-mustang-web mustang1
Younger model: Manchester apprenticeship scheme jump starts classic car …

On top of the classic car restoration industry only employing 22,000 skilled workers, 43% of them are 45-years-old or more. This means a significant proportion of the workforce will be retiring or coming up to retirement in the next 20 years. Not only
Auto parts: Rebuilt, remanufactured or reused?

These same rules apply to other remanufactured auto parts, whatever they may be. You will find that remanufactured auto parts usually carry a longer and stronger warranty, covering parts and labor for longer periods of time, compared to rebuild parts.

A Look At Drifting Clutch Technology With Spec

Thought I’d share this technology.  I have a Stage 2 Spec in my Corvette and has served me well on the street and auto cross.  Chase the link below to get all the details.

For most of us, we like our Mustangs to be well-rounded. Many of us can only afford one, so it needs to be able to do a few things other than just getting us from Point A to Point B. Fortunately, we can make a Mustang be good at a couple different types of performance without making wholesale changes. It’s pretty hard to make it great at several things at the same time, but we’re willing to make concessions in order to make it more than a one trick pony. We can take it to the drag strip, that’s easy. We can also take it road racing – which isn’t as easy – but we can still have a blast provided we have outfitted it accordingly with the right brakes. We can even take it drifting.

SPEC Clutches is a company that knows after the act of drag racing, drifting is something that comes natural to a Mustang. SPEC’s David Norton has been involved with drifting since the sport’s beginnings, and knows V8 power mixed with a tail-happy suspension, getting a Mustang to drift isn’t difficult.

Spec/s Drift clutch

Spec/s Drift clutch

via A Look At Drifting Clutch Technology With Spec.

Thanks for Reading.

Tim

spec clutches

2013 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 – The Bird Doc

… the track kicking butt and taking names. Big thanks goes out to London Chassis Dyno, Kenne Bell, Lund Racing, Revan Racing, Trucarbon, TruFiber, Viking Performance, SPEC Clutches, Jack Hart Body Shop, Bischoff Engine Service, and Bivins Racecars.

Ford Reportedly Filed Patent for 11-Speed Gearbox | Automotive News

We wonder when the number of gear wars will stop. It’s not something manufacturers are actually seeking to do (outdo one another by having more cogs), but the number is rising – the most recent report says Ford has already patented a 11-speed automatic gearbox; this is one more gear than they publicly announced.Ford had previously officially expressed its desire to equip the 2017 F-150 Raptor (pictured as design study concept below) with a 10-speed unit, but there had been no talk of an 11-speed one until now.However, even if Ford did file a patent, it doesn’t mean the gearbox will get made. Company spokesman for powertrains ambiguously said that “as a technology leader, we submit patents on innovative ideas as a normal course of business. Patent submissions help protect our new ideas but do not necessarily indicate future business or product plans.”

via Ford Reportedly Filed Patent for 11-Speed Gearbox | Automotive News.

 

Raptor - 11 speed?

Raptor – 11 speed?

 

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Tim

 

Ford is Working on an 11-Speed Transmission

Manufacturers start working on new technologies many years before we see them in production vehicles, and this patent from Ford points toward a new 11-speed transmission happening somewhere in their future. The official patent document was just …

 

 

Spec Page – 1954 Plymouth Belvedere Suburban

Spec Page is a new series where we explore a particular model’s DNA.

This post is covering a car that I’ve frankly never heard of before.  Plymouth Belvedere sure is recognizable as a 60’s muscle car (yes properly powered they were muscle cars) and Suburban as big hauler.  The 1954 Plymouth Belvedere Suburban was a hauler, but power house it wasn’t.

Plymouth Belvedere Suburban

Plymouth Belvedere Suburban

So lets start with the engine.  Weren’t  a lot of choices in 1954 and the standard for working class cars was the Plymouth’s flat head six.It was an iron block with L-head valves.  It had a bore and stroke of  3.25″  4.64″ and a compression ratio of 7.1:1 and displaced 217.8 cubic inches.  Topped with the a single carb barrel downdraft (normally a Carter Type BB model D5h2) help produce 100 hp.

Flat Head Six

Flat Head Six

All that power was transferred to the wheels was a 3 speed synchromesh on column and a Hypoid 3.73:1.  Once underway  stopped by 4-wheel hydraulic drum with double front cylinders. And those will be need to get this 3,000 plus pound, 189 inches (nearly 16 feet).

Supporting all this mayhem was a double-channel box frame with side rails and 4 cross members and Briggs all-steel body.  The suspension was independent in the front with coil springs and torsion sway bar with tapered leaf springs and 6.50 x 15″ tires and press steel safety rims.

You could buy his car with some added option like push-button radio, heater, two-tone paint, wire wheel covers, white side walls, bumpers guards, tissue dispenser, exhaust extension deflector locking gas cap, mirrors.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

 

Transitioning to Modern Transmissions Prt 3

 

Posted By John Katz, June 25, 2012 in E-News, Engine & Drivetrain

Part 1  http://wp.me/pKHNM-1cL
Part 2  http://wp.me/pKHNM-1cL

From www.hotrodandrestoration.com

Switch Shifters

With manual transmissions in demand, it isn’t surprising to find that a fair number of vehicles—particularly muscle-era vehicles—that left the factory with an automatic transmission are being rebuilt with a manual. Frederick estimated that about 60 percent of American Powertrain’s classic muscle car customers are replacing an automatic transmission with a manual.

“[The conversion] is time-consuming, but not terribly complicated,” Frederick said. “Most of the parts bolt in.”

“It isn’t for the faint-of-heart or for anyone short on patience, but it’s do-able,” Hill added. “It’s just a matter of working through the process.”

Obviously you’ll need a pedal assembly; fortunately, according to Hill, there are a lot of aftermarket units that work quite well.

“That also gives you the option of using a hydraulic release bearing instead of a mechanical clutch linkage, which, depending on the application, can have some advantages,” Hill said. “It’s going to take a longer or shorter drive shaft. It’s going to take a different yoke on that driveshaft. The power bushing in the motor for the transmission input shaft may have to be changed. The starter could be affected by the diameter of the flywheel you put into the vehicle.

“You start at the back of the crankshaft and start matching componentry as well as possible—and if you can’t match it, then you have to compensate for it,” Hill continued. “I don’t think we’ve ever run into something we couldn’t convert, as long as we’re talking about American muscle.”

Many of the same issues crop up even when swapping one manual for another—for example, the customer who has a 454 and a Muncie and wants to put a modern six-speed in it.

Like many other projects, it’s significantly easier with older (i.e., pre-computer) hardware. If either the engine or the transmission came with computer controls, it gets a little more involved. And keep in mind that even some modern manuals now have computer controls—the GM transmission that comes with the LS engine, for example, with its skip-shift function.

Of course, some customers will want to go the other way and replace a factory manual with a new, high-tech automatic.

“It’s most important to make sure you have all the correct components—and that you make the finished job look appealing to the customer,” said Poff of TCI. “It’s the mounting that’s most likely to give you trouble.”

According to the experts, you’ll need to ensure that you have the right crossmembers and that there’s enough room inside the tunnel.

“There is no one-size-fits-all solution; every application is unique,” added Poff. “But once the physical installation is accomplished, it’s pretty straightforward to make everything operational.”

Either way, Nichols suggested finding out from the customer how critical it is to keep the car looking original, versus the cost to locate and install all of the correct original components.

As with so much else in hot rodding, the best results generally come from purchasing and installing complete systems.

“That goes for any product from any company in this business,” Frederick said. “We say, ‘Look, we have a turnkey kit. We figured it all out, and all you to do it plug and play.’ Buy it all from one source and you know all the parts are going to work together.”

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

 

Transitioning to Modern Transmissions Prt 2

Posted By John Katz, June 25, 2012 in E-News, Engine & Drivetrain

From www.hotrodandrestoration.com

Stick Shifting

Meanwhile, manual-shift enthusiasts are upgrading to modern units packing more heavy-duty horsepower capacity—and more gear ratios.

“The generation that is now in their 60s can afford to build the cars that they wanted to build when they were in high school,” said Dick Hill, sales manager for Centerforce Clutches in Prescott, Arizona. And while those folks are not usually looking to build a race car, “they do want a four- or five-speed manual transmission,” he said.

More surprisingly, the trend extends beyond muscle cars and into traditional hot rods as well.

“I have friends who are building Deuce roadsters and they are putting LS motors in them, with a five- or six-speed manual transmission,” Hill said. “There are people who put Cadillac V-8s in 1949–1951 Mercs, and they want a stick. They want a three-pedal car. So that, too, is contributing to the growth of the high-performance clutch market.”

Hot rodders who already own or have owned multiple cars are now looking for something different.

“It’s like the people who buy their first Harley, they want it with every doo-dad they can get, where older bikers are turning back to the Knucklehead or even Flathead motors,” Hill said. “It’s the same with the hot rodder who already has two or three or four toys in the garage. The newest toy is going to be a stick car. And it’s for the same reason that someone will buy a brand-new Camaro, put 1,000 horsepower in it, and drive it on the street while blowing cold air and playing tunes. They want a manual not because they’re going to race it, but because they can have it. That’s what we hear all the time: ‘Because I can.’”

Rating the Ratios

American Powertrain of Cookeville, Tennessee, sells a broad range of high-performance drivetrain components, from complete crate engines to driveshafts and pedals. The company also distributes Tremec transmissions.

“The hot market right now is for the Magnum six-speed in a classic muscle car,” said Gray Frederick. “The Magnum is Tremec’s replacement for the T-56 is the aftermarket version of what you would get in a new Shelby GT500 or Camaro SS.” Frederick added that people are putting them into classic Mustangs Cougars, Camaros Firebirds, Barracudas and Challengers.

“The cars that people spend the most money on are the cars that [are] getting Magnum six-speeds,” Frederick added.

The Magnum is available with two sets of ratios, with the closer-ratio unit being the more popular of the two.

“The wide-ratio box has a 0.5 overdrive, which is very tall; a lot of engines can’t pull that much overdrive,” Frederick said.

But when it comes to overdrive, isn’t more better?

“That’s a myth,” Frederick said. “You can say, ‘Alright, I’m at the ragged edge of my cam, where if I’m on flat ground I can hold 70 mph all day.’ In a perfect world, that would be great. [I]n the real world, at some point you’re going to have to slow down for construction, and then speed up again; or you’re going to hit a rise, or something else that causes your engine to run out of breath. [T]hen you’re going to have to shift and that’s what you’re trying to avoid.

“You want to put it in sixth gear and leave it sixth gear,” he continued. “You don’t want to run down the highway at your cam’s peak performance, which would be 3,000–4,000 rpm. But you do want an rpm where your engine can pull your car up hills, and pass without dropping a gear. If every time you put your foot in the gas the engine lugs and you have to shift, that becomes very inefficient. We’re helping the customer understand that, even on the highway, you want to stay in your powerband. Otherwise the overdrive doesn’t do you any good.”

Frederick recommends the wide-ratio unit mostly for torquey big blocks.

“A Pontiac 455 will pull a stump out of the ground at 800 rpm; it doesn’t have trouble pulling a car at whatever rpm you’re running,” he said. “A Mopar 440 and some other big blocks with a lot of low-end grunt can usually handle the taller overdrive, too. And of course we’re dealing with a lot of electronically fuel-injected (EFI) engines now, and most of them have computers that can cope with low rpm very well.

They can retard the spark, they can meter the fuel differently, they can do all kinds of things.

“We help the customer choose a rearend ratio and a gear set that’s going to give them the best performance, from top to bottom,” Frederick said.

Pedal Pressure Another concern, according to Hill of Centerforce Clutches, is the physical effort once associated with a high-performance clutch.

“Our customers all ask, ‘How stiff is the pedal?’” he said. “That’s why we’ve been very successful, whether it’s a single-disc clutch for mild upgrade vehicle, or dual-disc unit that can hold 1,300 lbs./ft. of torque, we’ve been very successful in making them streetable.”

The average consumer, Hill said, could climb into a car with a Centerforce dual-disc clutch, push the pedal to the floor, and not realize that the car was modified.

“[T]he person who has a $75,000 Camaro or Corvette wants race-car performance without the race-car effort, so this is pretty significant,” he said.

Still, selecting the optimal clutch for any particular application is a complex task best left to experts.

“There are different linings and different friction materials on the pressure plate,” Hill said. “Heat is a factor. The first thing you have to know is how the vehicle is going to be used. Drag racers realize they are going to drive their car until they break it, where hot rodders don’t beat their cars up as bad. They are very proud of their cars and they want to drive them, not break them. And unless the car has been tubbed, a street machine generally runs smaller tires, so you want to tune the clutch for that.”

McLeod Racing of Placentia, California, offers its RST and RXT Street Twin clutches, both double-disc units that hold up to 1,000 horsepower, with the pedal pressure of a stock clutch, said President Paul Lee. Contributing to this low effort—and to easier installation—are McLeod’s hydraulic release bearings, “which fit most applications, replacing worn and/or outdated mechanical linkages,” he said.

“We’re selling more clutches for vehicles from the 1960s and 1970s, and installing a new hydraulic clutch in one of these cars can significantly reduce pedal effort,” said Rich Barsamian, national sales manager for Advanced Clutch Technology (ACT) in Lancaster, California. The company also offers a wide range of clutches for GM, Ford and Mopar applications, each rated for torque at the crankshaft.

When installing an aftermarket clutch, Barsamian suggested, “be sure to use the right amount of lube on the input shaft—it is possible to use too much. Be sure parts are free from dirt and oil, and washed in a non-petroleum-based cleaner such as acetone, alcohol or brake cleaner. Be sure to follow the correct torque and tightening sequence when installing the clutch cover—and do not use impact tools.”

Thanks for reading Part 3 coming up.