1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Carpet Laid

Thanks for picking backup with blogging of the work done on the 1973 Mustang Sports Roof (#ProjectSportsRoof).

The floors are done and the heat and sound barrier are completed and it’s time for the carpet.

I’ve seen some pretty awful quality carpet for cars and I’ve had friends that attempted to use the one piece kits with not great success.  I chose to go with ACC Carpet 2 piece set.  Because my car was ordered special ordered with the Mach I Interior I went with their “Original Style Molded Fastback Mach I for 1971-1973” (CJ’s Part Number MC9-V).  It is really well-formed and pre-cut for steering column and even dimmer switch.

The pieces come folded in a box and needs to be laid out flat for a while before installing. Luckily I live in Arizona and the sun makes quick work for that.

Carpet2

Here are the two pieces laid out on the hood of #ProjectSportsRoof.

Carpet1a

This image shows the pre-cuts and forming in the front piece.  ‘A’ is the cutout for the steering Column, ‘B’ is the quality built-in vinyl floor mat, ‘C’ is the cutout for the dimmer switch and  ‘D’ is the very well-formed door jamb and finally ‘E’ is the transmission tunnel formed part.

Here’s a pick of how it just lays there and conforms to the floor.

Carpet5

Now check out the full shot with the front sections in place and the shift bezel in place.  Looks pretty good, yes?

Carpet8a

At point ‘A’ you can see the contour of the floor mat portions of the carpet piece.  ‘B’ is the hole with the seat mounting stud protruding (you have to cut that) and both ‘C’ locations show just a simple X cut to allow the seat bolts to slip through.

This last still shot is with the rear pieces laid out.

Carpet16a

 

You can see the forming in the carpet where the rear mount of the front set lays.  The circle is where I had to cut to allow the bolt to slide in.

Here is  little video.

 

I’m very please with this carpet.  As of this blogging I haven’t finished trimming it. In real-time it’s been a few months.  I had to put the seats back in and get it to a charity car show.   Before I had a chance to get back to carpet, the Cleveland developed a bottom end knock and that’s were we are today.  I can finish up more interior work while the engine is out.

The 351C rebuild is coming up next for #ProjectSportsRoof.

Thanks for reading!!!

Tim

1973 Mustang SportsRoof

1973 Mustang SportsRoof

Average Guy’s Car Restorations, Mods, and Racing

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. With the floor pans welding, sealing and coating finished the next step was to apply the heat and sound barrier. This is …
Great American Muscle Cars – Community – Google+

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. With the floor pans welding, sealing and coating finished the next step was to apply the heat and sound barrier. This is …

 

Engine Mini-Series Ford’s Small Block V8s Part II – 260 CID

Welcome back.  I’m continuing on with the Engine Mini-Series – Ford’s Small Block V8s.  This post covers the 260 CID.

I did mention I’d touch on the 255 but that is really out of chronological order and was merely a muted 302 used on for 3 years.  It was dropped for poor performance.

So following the 221 engine (to see the post click here) was the 260 CID.  This came about after the poor performance of the 221 and even with the release of a tweaked version.   Enter Ford’s 260 CID.  It retained the same intake and exhaust ports as the 221, the valves were larger (intake was now 1.76 and exhaust was 1.45).  With it’s bore increased to 3.80 with no change to the stroke the engine put out 164 hp (about 20 more than the 221).  It had a plane jane hydraulic cam and a compression ratio of 8.7:1 and capped off with a two barrel cast iron intake and carb.

The 260 was the engine Carrol Shelby used in his original Cobra and it was selected by the British car maker for the Sunbeam Tiger.

Shelby's 1962 Cobra

Shelby’s 1962 Cobra

1962 Sunbeam Tiger with Ford 260

1962 Sunbeam Tiger with Ford 260

The 260 was in service from 1962 to 1964 and it powered the likes of the Fairlane, Meteor (at least as an option), Comet(at least as an option), Falcon and in 1964 even the Mustang 64 1/2 (F code cars).

Engine was an  overhead valve, Cast iron block with a bore and stroke 3.80 x 2.87 and Compression ratio 8.8:1 with 164 hp. It held 5 main bearings, hydraulic lifters and Autolite 2 bbl carb (Model C40F-9510-B) (Mustang configuration).  The 260 was  also called the Challenger 260 and could to be found topped with  a Holley 2bbl Carb vs. the Autolite.

1964 Ford 260 V8

1964 Ford 260 V8

Next up the Engine Mini-Series Part II the 289!!

Thanks for reading.

Tim

STangATWork

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engine Mini Series – Chevy’s 283 Prt1

So far my writings are about engines have been ones I owned and the 283 was the engine in my very first car.  It was a 1966 Chevy Impala.  It was a gift to me for my 1976 high school graduation.  The car was restored by my father, who was …

Engine Mini Series – Chevy’s 283 Prt 2

Oh yes, believe it or not, the 283 put the Corvette at the cutting edge of performance in 1957, fitted with the RamJet FI (fuel injection) system (“fuelie” was the gearhead term for that).  In 1958 the 283 was the base engine for the Corvette, but the 283 that use …

Engine Mini Series – Chevy’s 283 Part 3

This is the part of the engine series where I list the uses for the power plant.  The 283, as I mentioned, carried Chevy engines to the next level, by being the first engine that car manufacturers were able to coax out the same horsepower as the displacement. From 1957 (its …

A Couple of Mustang Things – Line-Lock and Mustang Crossing

As I work on getting more restoration work on #ProjectSportsRoof I thought I’d share a couple of Mustang things that popped up.

There are a number of reasons I love Ford products, in particular Mustangs.  One of those is the fact that it didn’t need the bailout money a few years back, choosing to tough it out and some of the innovative/purposeful special purpose options.

I recently received my Ford Mustang ‘Go Further’ brochure.  I’m not including the 310 hp they are dragging out of the 2.3L EcoBoost (I’ve often said “I don’t want anything on my dash that says Eco!!!!”  but wow to the 320 lb-ft of torque. Don’t even think bout the 435 hp and 400 lbs-ft of torque from the 5.0L in the GT…come on!!!!  I can do with out the heated and cooled seat…meh…   However, the Track Apps, MagneRide and launch control are bomb.

The most #awesome purpose built is the Electronic Line-Lock!!!!  Come on…that’s what every weekend racing warrior (and spirited every day driving!!) wants a car manufacture to be thinking about!!!    The Electronic Line-Lock keeps the front brakes locked while you ‘warm up’ the Mustang’s rear tires….come on I don’t have that in my Corvette!!!  But maybe I can figure it out for my 1973 ‘Stang.

It looks something like this…exactly like this:

 

Here’s a great little destination (after you warmed up the tires).  Located at the corner of “No Where” (Hwy 90) and “U’r Lost” (Hwy 82) is this little place called Mustang Crossing.

Great place for a 1973 Mustang photo shoot!!!

Thanks for stopping by.  More coming up on #ProjectSportsRoof.

 

Thanks for reading.

Tim

#ProjectSportsRoof

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1973 Mustang Project SportsRoof – Exterior Walk-Around

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof.  I run my car projects much like I run my IT projects.  You always have to know where to start and know the end game.   As with any project that isn’t being built from scratch, in other word, you have to work with what you’ve got, …

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Finishing Up

Greetings followers.

If it seemed to you like I was never going to get to the end of the floor pan part of #ProjectSportsRoof,  you weren’t alone, it seemed that way to me as well.  With power plant problems (Knock..Knock…Who’s There? It’s the bottom end of your 351 Cleveland!!!), digit maiming (Injury Time Out – 1973 Mustang SportsRoof) and life occurring in between the actually completion of the install and getting to the blogging/sharing part of this project.   So here is the final two posts.

After my neighbor Dan Thomas skillfully tacked the panels in place it was time to seal the seams and give the passenger cabin floor a coating.

Here is what I used to carry out the next to last task.

 

The Eastwood seam sealing putty was warmed up by rolling it around in the palm of my hand and then wedged into the seams like those indicted in this pic:

seams-1

If you recall we just tack welded the panel so there were a number of seams that need some putty.

 

I roughly sanded and vacuumed the rest of the floor and then used the truck bed liner from a rattle can and made several pass over the entire floor.

Take a look:

This was just the first coat.

This leaves the application of the heat and sound barrier and replacing the carpet to finish up the this part of the project.

I’ll cover that in the final, final post.   🙂

Thanks for reading.

Tim

STangATWork

 

 

 

 

 

 

projectsportsroof

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Welding

1 day ago Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. Floor pan are ready to be welded into place on the 1973 Mustang Sportsroof. Now I’m not a welder and …
1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Part Four …

Apr 19, 2016 Finishing up the right side rear foot-well on #ProjectSportsRoof.

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Welding

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof.  Floor pan are ready to be welded into place on the 1973 Mustang Sportsroof.

Now I’m not a welder and there was no way I was going to experiment on the Mustang.  So I enlisted the assistance of my neighbor Dan Thomas.  Dan is quite the artist with his welding and metal work and although this build didn’t require much fancy design work…just quality welds and Dan delivered.

The goal here is to tack the fitted metal patch panels in place.  The welds need to be strong and in the proper places.   Now you might say, “Hey did you say that the Mustang is a unit-body and that the floor needed to be strong since that’s what holds the car together – mostly?”  Yes that is true, however this Mustang will have frame connectors added to make this reasonable.

Just a note about the welding, you have to use gas with the mig…the metal for the patch panels are not that thick and the portions of the floor you are welding it to are old…so you need the added gas.

To start with I needed to strip the tack locations down to bare metal.  You can see some of that in this image.

PreWelding-1

Here a little video clip of the work.  Note: Don’t adjust your device’s volume….there is no sound on the first part of the video…well there was, but it was mostly me chewing gum…not very cool to listen too.

Here is some of Dan’s most excellent work.

LtWelded-1 RtWElded-1
RtWelded-2 RtWelded-3
Weldpic1 Weldpic2
WeldPic3 Thanks Dan!!!

Thanks for following along with the project.  Drop me any questions, comments and/or your thoughts!!!! Coming up next is the coating of the floor and the heat and sound barrier.

Tim

STangATWork

Stang at work!

 

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Part Four …

Apr 19, 2016 Finishing up the right side rear foot-well on #ProjectSportsRoof.

ford mustang mach | Tumblr

ProjectSportsRoofAuto RestorationAutoBlogClassic CarsFord MustangMach I Muscle CarsMustangVintage Cars. 2 notes. Loading…Show more notes. Reblog.

1973 Mustang – Project Sports Roof – Pertronix Ignitor Update

Well win some and you lose some.  If you’ve seen my other posts related the replacement of the points and condenser for the 351C you’ll notice that I gave conversion high marks.  This was all based on the years of use I got out of the conversion I did on …

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Part Five

Welcome back to the final few posts of the floor pan replacement for #ProjectSportsRoof.

Let’s get right down to it.

I realized that I didn’t catch much of the work on the floor plan under the right rear seat.  That was really a lot of work.  They don’t make a panel for that on the 1973 Mustang SportsRoof.  So I had to use a foot well panel and “customize” it to fit.  See here:

This shot is that pre-welding and it shows the hole above the muffler, under the seat.  (Sorry for the short clip)

This image shows the customized foot well floor panel:

A lot of work went into forming that panel.

A lot of work went into forming that panel.

Yes it was tough to make it, there were a lot of cuts. (The tub there is Irish Spring soap – it keeps pack rats out of the Mustang while it’s parked!)

If you recall the left side of the car wasn’t bad at all and I replaced just the foot well panel.  It cut the same as the right side and here it is in place.  Here’s a little recap of the work done.

 

Next up is the welding, coating and heat/sound barrier.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

#ProjectSportsRoof

 

projectsportsroof

restored car | Tumblr

Hey, welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof (1973 Mustang). We are working through the rusted floor pans and I’m about to make the cut for removing rust from  …
ford-mustang-mach-i | Tumblr

ProjectSportsRoofAuto RestorationAutoBlogClassic CarsFord MustangMach I Muscle CarsMustangVintage Cars. 2 notes. Loading…Show more notes. Reblog.

 

 

 

 

Knock..Knock…Who’s There? It’s the bottom end of your 351 Cleveland!!! Rebuilding.

The option that, perhaps, makes the most sense is to rebuild the existing engine.   These days there are so many rebuilding scenarios, it can make your head spin and really lighten you wallet.  With each one of the scenarios brings with it even more decisions and a host of mathematical calculations.

The major concern is just how bad it might be in the block.  You can see much with just the heads removed, but what I could see of the cylinders and piston heads, seemed serviceable.  Scored cylinder walls – bad; just trashed bearings – not so bad.  This is the first unknown you need to know.  From this point you’ll know the cost of just making it run again and how much $$$ you need or have left in the budget for any upgrades.

For me I don’t think I’m in this for just a ‘repair’-  e.g. bad bearings – replace them and snap it back together.

Option 1: Rebuild it just like it is.  Simply get a $600.00 kit and replace everything and put it back together – same heads, same intake nothing changes other than the knock goes away.

Typical 351C Rebuild Kit

Typical 351C Rebuild Kit

Option 2:  Rebuild it better.  For my 351C  2v, the simplest way is to add the kit and give it more room to breath.  Add a 4 barrel carb and matching intake.

Option 3:  Rebuild it bigger.  Have the engine bore to 0.030 or 0.040 and find the matching kit (you can buy the rebuild kits to match the new bore) and add a 4 barrel carb and matching intake.

Option 2 and 3 give you more decisions you’ll have to make.  How much horse power and torque will this changes make?  Can you existing stall converter and transmission handle that increase? (My concern as I have  C6 automatic)  Will you need to change the gearing in the rear end to optimize the new power?  Will this new power impact handling or frame/body?  (The concern here keeping that body from twisting/rolling – my Mustang still has the sub-frame – being a unit body – installation of sub-frame connectors is on my list.)     You are looking at a few Benjamin’s to make this all happen like it should – all based on the basic rebuild direction.

So these are some of the considerations I’m weight now for #ProjectSportsRoof.

Give me your thoughts?

Thanks for reading.

Tim

1973 Mustang SportsRoof

1973 Mustang SportsRoof

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

projectsportsroof

1973 Mustang – Project SportsRoof – Compression Test Part I

I’ve done all the clean up and all the adjustments necessary to get a good reading on the health of the ’72 351C engine in my 1973 Mustang. The next step is to check the compression. First up was to warm the car a bit and then pull the plugs. Here’s what the …

1973 Mustang – Project SportsRoof – Compression Test Part II

This is the wrap up on the compression testing for the 1973 Mustang w/ a 1972 351 Cleveland power plant. You’ll might have notices that I referred to the remote tester, which is my code for remote starter…yeah…that’s it!!! All of these tests were dry test and I should have done a …

Hey…A Car Show!!! Mustang II

It’s pretty cool to happen upon a car show in the course of running weekend errands.  I normally have a calendar event for the major shows and/or the ones I plan on attending.  But now and then I see one in passing, and of course I am compelled to stop and usually do.  Sometimes there are some real gems.  By gens  I mean  cars you don’t see at the average car show as they may not be in top condition or even restored at all (that doesn’t stop me) and the owners would enter them.

You don't need shiny paint to go to a car show. Here's #ProjectSportsRoof at it's first car show.

You don’t need shiny paint to go to a car show. Here’s #ProjectSportsRoof at its first car show.

A couple of weeks ago I picked up my son at his place and we took care of some business.  I always have my ‘old car’ radar on and it went off as we passed a little church.  We had finished all of our tasks so I stopped.  There may have been 15 cars in the parking lot with hoods up and doors open.  True to form there were a few cars that one rarely sees at a car show.

This awesome Fox-body Mustang Vert was in the line-up:

Fox-Body Vert

Fox-Body Vert w/ Whale Tail!

Oh MAN!! Look at that plumbing!!!!

Oh MAN!! Look at that plumbing!!!!

 

There was this 1964 Chrysler 300 K.  You don’t see many of these at a show.  Love that it’s a 2 door.

'64 Chrysler 300 K

’64 Chrysler 300 K

Cool Steering Wheel!!

Cool Steering Wheel!!

Here is a rare sight!!!  Mercury Comet Caliente VERT!!!!

This Comet is in O.K.shape

This Comet is in O.K.shape

IMG_20160409_095300697

This cars is nicely preserved and a little body work has been done, but still very nice car.

But this next car was my favorite as unlikely as that may seem, I’d buy this car and I’d show it big time!!!  Check out this 1974 Mustang II:

I think it's a sharp little car!!!

I think it’s a sharp little car!!!

IMG_20160409_094934783

Nice wheels!!!!

Yeah..that's a V8 - 302!!

Yeah..that’s a V8 – 302!!

Still lots of room under that hood.

Still lots of room under that hood.

Interior is so awesome.

Interior is so awesome.

 

You can tell that this car was stripped and restored.  It was painted with, even the interior,  with a white rhino lining/satin like paint.  It is just amazing and I’m was impressed.

Thanks for reading.

Tim

Check out these other post for Mustang II:

The Mustang II – Say What?
http://wp.me/pKHNM-uY

Mustang Muscle in the Mid 70’s
http://www.average-guys-car-restoration-mods-racing.com/mustang-muscle-in-the-mid-70s/

Feature Car – 1978 King Cobra
http://www.average-guys-car-restoration-mods-racing.com/feature-car-1978-king-cobra/

 

 

Knock..Knock…Who’s There? It’s the bottom end of your 351 Cleveland!!!

After spending $$$ to get my 2v heads done right and after driving my 73 Stang for about 50 miles, the Cleveland has developed  a knock in the bottom half of the engine.

It’s not uncommon when restoring cars that an undiscovered issue pops up and changes the entire project plan.  But the dilemma I have now has multiple facets.

First there’s what to do about the engine.  Rebuild it if possible? Replace with a short block, reusing the 2v heads?  Buy a crate engine? Or set it on fire in the driveway?  Each one of these options have it’s own inherent hurdles and impacts the timeline differently.

Second there’s issue with the old conundrum “Well as long as….I might as well do the ….”  In this case it read like this… “As long as the engine out, I should, really, redo the engine bay.”  That’s has is own timeline with the cleaning and sanding and priming and painting and replacing clips/fastener….etc.

So let’s discuss the engine.

There are a few “known knowns” (thank you Donald Rumsfeld!!!):

  1. The current 351C engine isn’t original to the car – in fact the car was born with 302. Why is that important?   I don’t have to worry about the matching numbers thing,  that ship sailed sometime ago.  Basically anything goes.
  2. Not rebuilding/replacing is not an option.
  3. Budget.  Although there is no set dollar amount, there is restraint how much can be spend in a given time.

Then there are the “known unknowns”

  1. Is it the cam?
  2. Is it just the bearings?
  3. Are the cylinder walls serviceable?
  4. What do I want this engine to be?

Options:  (just a few)

Option 1:   A friend of mine suggested a crate engine – just order one from Summitt Racing or Jegs.  Make all the power I want.

Ford Racing 363 C.I.D. 500 HP Boss Crate Engines

Ford Racing 363 C.I.D. 500 HP Boss Crate Engines – $8439.97

– Discussion:  $$$ (Could stop right there with this one.)  Getting a 400+ HP turn-key crate would be just awesome.  In my option that is what these Mustangs were meant to be. (ching-ching)   Getting tons of power to the rear wheels with the current  automatic C6 transmission will required a possible rebuild and an upgraded torque converter.  (ching-ching again).  But having a Cleveland in the engine bay is way cool!!  I grew up in GM family… there weren’t a lot of discussion about Ford product and anytime I heard “Ford talk” a 351 Cleveland engine was mentioned.   I do like the look of it under the hood the are wider than the Windsor family of motors.  Keeping it a 351C V2 will be less expensive and you can make good power from it if you do it right.

– Conclusion for Option 1:   Not gonna happen!!

Option 2:  Find a good used 351C and install that

– Discussion:   This is a good possibility.  That’s already happened to #ProjectSportsRoof.  The 302 was replaced with a 351 (whether it was a Windsor or Cleveland is not known) as this was the engine the previous owner hauled it out of a field with.  As it turned out that engine was seized and the current engine was found and installed (along with the used C6 trans).   It may be tough to find one.  If and when you do the mileage shouldn’t be a known unknown and you need to determine the condition as best you can by listening to it run.  If it is just sitting on the shelf,  would you perform a “trust-fall” with the seller?  Bottom line is a used engine “is like a box of chocolates”…you might end right back up where you are now.  Frankly this would be my last option.

-Conclusion for Option 2:  A weak maybe.

Coming up next – the Rebuild option.

Thoughts? Suggestions?

Tim

 

Tappit-3

1973 Mustang SportsRoof – Floor Pans Getting To It! – Part Four

Thanks for checking back on #ProjectSportsRoof.   I’m about the finish the cuts and fitting for the  right rear foot-well that was rust all the way!!!!

Final Fit for foot-well.

Final Fit for foot-well.

This video is pretty comprehensive so I’m just going to just let it roll.

 

A couple of things worth noting.  The “flap” what was clearly not going to work and leaving the sheet metal running up the side of the transmission/drive shaft tunnel was going to give too much flex in that panel, as the welds would be pretty high.  It’s important to have that solid because as most must guys and gals know the Mustang of this vintage only have sub-frames which lease the floor as the most important body stabilization part of the car.   I will eventually put sub-frame connectors under this beast.

In case you are wondering what that electrical wiring is to the right of foot-well that is for the seat belt switch which when pressure is applied to the seat bottom there must be a connection completed by the seat-belt male end and female end to turn off the “Seat Belt” light and or buzzer.

I have a lot more coming up on the floor pans so stay tuned!!!!

Thanks for reading.

Tim

1973 Mustang SportsRoof

1973 Mustang SportsRoof

 

 

 

 

 

vintage muscle car | Tumblr

Welcome back to #ProjectSportsRoof. We beginning the actual work on the vacuum system on the projects 351C starting with the valve assembly distributor ( the …